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North Shore Morning

AM Community Calendar/photo by masochismtango on Flickr

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News & Information

News and information, interviews, weather, upcoming events, music, school news, and many special features. North Shore Morning includes our popular trivia question - Pop Quiz! The North Shore Morning program is the place to connect with the people, culture and events of our region!

 


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CodeRed - High-Speed Emergency Notification System

The Cook County Sheriff’s Office is encouraging residents to sign up for CodeRED. It’s designed to be a high-speed mass notification system to help keep us safe in the event of an emergency.

CJ Heithoff talks with Valerie Marasco, director of the Office of Emergency Management & Public Information.

You can register for CodeRED at:https://www.co.cook.mn.us/under the Sheriff’s Office or Emergency Management / Public Information pages.

 

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Sawtooth Elementary - School News Dec 05

Sawtooth Mountain Elementart - School News - December 5, 2017
featuring Lucas, Kian, Mali and Karis.

Mrs. Smith's kindergarten class has been busy with engineering projects, swimming lessons at the "Y", and illustrating stories.

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint December 1, 2017

Wildersmith on the Gunflint - December 1, 2017     by     Fred Smith

Going into the final scene of 2017, activity amongst us humans is easy going along the Gunflint Byway. It’s the shoulder season for businesses along the Trail while we all wait in anticipation for winter to get fully underway.                                                                                                       
Life is pretty calm as the sands of time trickle toward another new year, but atmospheric things are a happening not to the liking for many of us.       
                                                       
Right after the big turkey day, “old man winter” took a hike, leaving the area in a mire of rainy clouds, drippy roof tops and snow melting to slush. Being under the white pine canopy, the yard around Wildersmith had minimal snow, and what was there is now melted back to autumn brown. Guess we’ll be starting winter all over again. Other places throughout the forest still have a measure of snow, but everything white has taken a beating.  
                                                          
A brief thermometer down tick returned conditions to the ice making mode before spiking up once again over the past few days. This made for slippery going, with backcountry roads, driveways and walking paths in a state of being an accident waiting to happen. So far, the Smiths’ have been cautious remaining in the upright position, but it isn’t easy. I hope the same for others moving about along the Trail.           
                                                                                                                           
With our pronounced driveway incline, I sometimes wonder if the vehicle might be there until spring, should I not be able to negotiate the curvy hill to upper level parking. Actually, getting up the slippery slope is of less concern than coming down. Knowing trees are the only means of halting an uncontrolled slide into the lake, it’s always a “white knuckler” in the absence of dry snow.        
                                                                                                                                     
Whereas a meltdown used to happen about once a season, such situations seem to be occurring with far more frequency over the past few years. With the approaching holiday season in mind, yes “Virginia, there is a Santa Claus,” and yes, “Ginny”, “climate change” is becoming a real nag on nature!   
                                                                                                                                                     
One might expect a return to normal “Biboon” (winter in Ojibwe) eventually, but in the meantime, those of us with a zest for snow/cold remain rather subdued. Perhaps the cold, “little spirit” moon, of Sunday morning, can get our “spirit of the north” off his duff and back to work. Maybe a little “snow dance” would add support!                                                                     
A couple of friends were hiking the Lonely Lake Trail and high cliffs above Gunflint Lake last weekend and shivered at an episode of howling wolves. Wonder if the pack might have been beckoning the “old man of the north” to get back on track?    
                                                                                                                                        
The cold season set back is no doubt causing  frustration with business owners as they are gearing up for seasonal activities. In as much as last week, cross country ski tracks were laid in the mid-trail area around Bearskin Lodge, and other trails in the system were being packed. It would appear the now diminished snow pack might be putting prep’s on hold. Meanwhile snowmobilers are also stymied with too little snow to even open their sledding system, and ice making has turned oozy.        
                                                                                                                                                  
On a brighter side of things out this way, residents of the Gunflint Community are reminded of the OPEN HOUSE CHRISTMAS PARTY, Saturday (the 2nd) from 4:00 to 7:00 pm. The Trail Volunteer Fire Department is hosting the doings at the Schaap Community Center (Mid-Trail). Food and refreshments are provided by Department members. All Gunflint neighbors are invited! In the SPIRIT of this giving season, a donation to the local food shelf is welcomed!     
                                            
Although the landscape blanket is depleted at the moment, planning is well under way for the colorful Gunflint Mail Run January 6th. With the race little over a month away, the call is out for volunteers. Many are needed to make this upper trail dog sledding adventure happen.       
                  
If Trail folks have helped before, organizers need you once again. If you have not been a part of the team in previous years, but want to join in, get in touch with the Mail Run volunteer coordinator Cathy Quinn, 218-387-3352 ASAP, or sign-up on line…gunflintmailrunvolunteer@ @gmail.com.                                                                                                                                                                
For WTIP, this is Wildersmith, on the Gunflint Trail, where every-day life in the forest, is great, regardless of slushy set-backs!                                                                    
     
 

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Great Expectations School News Dec 1

Great Expectations - School News with Amos and Jordan.
December 1, 2017

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Superior National Forest Update November 24, 2017

National Forest Update – November 23, 2017.

Hi.  I’m Tom McCann, resource information specialist, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior.  With the change of season, we’re changing this program to air only every other week until spring.  Here’s what’s happening these next two weeks.

With the advent of winter comes winter driving.  With temperatures right around freezing, we can have some hazardous icy conditions out on the roads.  You might be in a clear area where the warm sun keeps the road above freezing, then go over a hill or hit a shady patch, and suddenly the road is covered in ice, or just hit that time of day when the day’s puddles become the night’s ice rink.  Watch out, and leave plenty of following distance between you and the car ahead.

There are plenty of good reasons to get out though, despite the possible ice.  One is that it is again the season for holiday greenery!  Permits for Christmas trees are only five dollars, and they smell so much better than the artificial variety.  Balsam firs make for fragrant long lasting Christmas trees, and in many places their removal might actually help the forest ecosystem.  Know your trees though, it is illegal to cut white pine or cedar with a Christmas tree permit, and while it is legal to cut a spruce, they lose their needles in a hurry.  If you have a child in fourth grade, they are eligible this year for a free permit through the “Every Kid In A Park” program.  Visit “Every Kid In A Park” online and register - full details and links can be found on the Superior’s website. You may also wish to harvest balsam boughs for making wreaths.  A personal use permit for making up to five wreaths is available for $20.  Princess pine, a small pine tree shaped club moss often used to decorate wreaths, may not be harvested on the Superior.

For full details on harvesting balsam boughs or Christmas trees, refer to our Holiday Greenery flyer, or our Holiday Greenery web page.   You’ll find lots of identification info as well as the rules and guidelines on harvesting.

If you’ve eaten too much turkey, and would like to start on your New Year’s resolution to exercise ahead of time, you’ll be interested to know that the Superior National Forest, in partnership with local trail partners, has decided to open limited sections of the trails at the Norpine and Flathorn/ Gegoka Trail Systems to dual use of fat tire biking and cross country skiing.  These sections of trail, in addition to single track bike trails at Pincushion, are now open to fat tire cyclists.  Visitors who are interested in fat tire biking opportunities on the Norpine Ski Trail System or at Pincushion should check the Visit Cook County website for current trail conditions and opportunities.  Cyclists who are interested in exploring the trails at Flathorn/ Gegoka should contact National Forest Lodge in Isabella for trail conditions and information.  Links to both websites can be found in the Current Conditions box for those trails on our website.

As a reminder, this dual use is being authorized in partnership with area ski and cycling associations and it is our hope that the use of fat tire bikes will not detract from the skiing experience.  Cyclists are reminded that bikers should always yield to skiers and they should only use the portions of trail which are not tracked for skiing.

Speaking of dual use, logging truck traffic is lighter this week.  Winter hauling on Gunflint is taking place on the following roads: Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, and the Gunflint Trail.   Tofte logging traffic will be on the Pancore Road, Sawbill Trail, the 4 Mile Grade, Trappers Lake Road, Temperance River Road, and the Wanless Road.  Remember that if a small road looks plowed, there is a good chance it is being used to haul on. 

Whether you hit the trails on a fat tire bike, or go off in search of the perfect tree for your living room, get out and enjoy our winter.  It beats sitting at home waiting for spring, because it will be a long wait!  Until next time, this has been Tom McCann with the National Forest Update.
 

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint November 23,2017

WTIP News     November 24, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint    by  Fred Smith

‘Tis the season, let the holiday madness begin, while we “Gunflinters” watch the chaos from afar. Blessed is our border country peace and quiet with the bounty of “Amazon” and UPS just a click away. No crowds, no fuss, what a deal!                                                                                                          

Speaking of good tidings for the coming season, the Smith’s will be looking forward to those good folks over on Birch Lake lighting up their annual holiday sentinel in the coming days. With exception of some decorative lighting in the mid-Trail business area, this sparkling testament to the holidays, adds a glitter of excitement to the otherwise absolute dark of night, along the byway.                                                                                                                                                                         

Another seasonal happening is the Borealis Chorale held in early December at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in the village. Several of our Gunflint Trail neighbors are members of this amazingly talented choir and orchestra. I’m told practices have been long underway.                                                                                               

We at Wildersmith hope your stuffing day was a pleasant gathering of family and friends.  The Smith’s had the pleasure of working/serving at the forty-fourth UCC Community dinner. Locally, this long running Thanksgiving celebration is such a joy for both the preparing volunteers and those who come to partake in the bounty.                                                                                                                                                        

Nationwide, and even on the local scene, there is however some measure of sadness. If we, in this self-proclaimed greatest country of the world, really pay attention, over forty millions of our fellow citizens struggle with hunger while living in poverty, including thirteen  millions of children who go to bed hungry each night.                                                                                                                                                  

How can we ever be so self-satisfied in times of this on-going need, while over indulging? This is a “great American tragedy” and should be real food for thought as we begin to “just go nuts at Christmas.”  Instead of putting Thanksgiving in the rear view mirror, every one of means should be looking at themselves in this mirror asking, “what can I do”!  Solving this domestic hunger problem alone will better define the US of A as “truly” great!                                                                                                                               

Reflecting on our wild country weather, it’s been pretty seasonal for the second straight week. A couple mini snow, sleet and freezing drizzle episodes have been the only moisture happenings in the upper Trail region. Meanwhile the mercury spiked up for a drippy day or two and then scurried back down to make more crust on the miniscule fallen white.                                                                                             

With coldness in mind, the big lakes up this way remain rolling with even the slightest whimper of wind, while ice making continues on lakes south of the Laurentian Divide. I’ve observed Poplar Lake, the largest down that direction, has put its’ on winter coat, so those up toward Trails end, can’t be too far behind. A couple nights of calm air should do the trick.                                                                                      
 
By the way the average “ice on” for the Gunflint is in the second week of December. I’m guessing the yearly “ice on” contest pool for those living around Gunflint Lake is taking dates right now!                                                                                                                                                                                         
A fresh skiff of snow last Saturday night covered the crusty blanket in the yard around Wildersmith. Not to beat a deceased horse about my observance of tracks in the snow, foot prints in the fluff were so many one would think a herd went through. Fox and pine martens, to mouse tunnels and other neighborhood beings in between, left their imprints. All of which were headed in a hundred different directions.                                                                                                                           

Cross country skiing is on the minds of many, and trail preparations are well under way. However, the grooming process is only in the packing stage. According to Dan Baumann at Golden Eagle, the snow base is adequate, but tracks have not been laid as this weeks’ report airs. I’m sure other sections of the mid to upper Trail system are at similar stages of getting ready. A check of lodge websites will surely advise when final touches have been applied. In the meantime, skiers are welcome to come out and get on the packed lowland stretches.                                                                                                                    

Recently, during a break from saw dust making, a frenzy of blue jays caught my attention. At our deck side eatery, two of the provision stations feature ear corn on a spike. I watched as half dozen jaybirds took turns badgering each other for position in order to chow down on the golden grains.                                                                                                                                                                                  

Now some of you listener/readers might be wondering if this guy doesn’t have enough to do, other than watching a flock of birds making pigs of them self. Guess I don’t, but I did find interesting, there was one, a bully amongst the bullies; two, there may be some apparent pecking order; and three, the number of maize seeds gorged into their gullets ranged from six to twelve per stop.                                                                                                                                                        

The gluttonous interlude found the two cobs devoured of their golden elements in fifteen minutes. While it would seem they might choke, none did during this chapter of my “wild neighborhood” story.                                                                                                                                                              

For WTIP, this is Wildersmith, on the Gunflint Trail, where every day is great, as each one offers something new, to see and learn! 
 

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Birch Grove Elementary - School News November 22

Birch Grove Elementary School News with Nataliya, Dayne and Rolan.
November 22, 2017

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Thanksgiving turkey.jpg

Sawtooth elementary students' "I am thankful" poems

Leading up to Thanksgiving, fourth grade students at Sawtooth Mountain Elementary have been writing poems about what they are thankful for.  WTIP's Sterling Anderson recently visited their classroom to record the poems.

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint November 17

WTIP News     November 17, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith

As “old father time” would have it, we’ve passed the halfway mark of November.  While the days have whisked by, the day of the big gobbling bird is suddenly on the menu. Although we Americans should be giving thanks every day for our bounteous blessings, its striking many can only bundle thanks into one day a year.                                                                                                               
“Old man winter” has pulled in his horns in recent days. However, it didn’t begin until he had delivered some frosty reminders of things to come. During the cold snap, the Wildersmith neighborhood recorded our first below zero temps and a couple days where the mercury could rise only into the single digits.                                                                                                                                        
Talk about dedication or maybe craziness, during one of those single digit days last week, a boat of fisher people went by on the Gunflint Gal. To yours truly, one must have a serious addiction to angling to be wetting a hook in such bitter conditions and dangerously cold waters. Fishing through the ice is one thing, but the risk this time of year seems not worthy.                                         
The other element of the season has been sparse, as a few clippers have whistled through dropping only a skiff each time. Nevertheless, it was enough to freshen up the six to eight inches already layered throughout the territory until the recent meltdown.                                                                                           
An interesting article caught my attention recently in the November-December issue of MINNESOTA CONSERVATION VOLUNTEER. Author Mark Spoden relates to sounds in the cold stillness of the woods from a deer hunters point of view. As I have often talked about din in the winter forest, Spodens’ spin on trying to be noiseless while getting from the vehicle to the deer stand is abundantly humorous. In addition his commentary is thought provoking on the incidental clatter we take for granted, inadvertently made while trying to be quiet in a noise-filled world. I urge listeners to get a copy of MCV and enjoy this article. Regardless of one’s enthusiasm for hunting, the last paragraph says it all!                                                                                                                                  
 I can’t help but reflect joy in the pure beauty of driving down a back country road this time of year. Such white charm is never so taken for granted until on a return trip from the village, I perused through forty plus miles of man-made slop on the Trail with temps hanging around the freezing point. It’s amazing what a mess we humans can make out of such purity, all for the sake of drivers never having to slow down.  I can accept it has to be for safety benefit, but it is so grungy.                                                                                                                                           
Contrast was stark as I departed the public thoroughfare onto the privacy of the Mile O Pine. The gray/brown wintry sloppiness of human conveyance routine, suddenly gave way to another world.                                                                                                                                                                        
Roadway snow remained white as the day it fell. Except for the snow plowers’ blade and a few pair of tire tracks, the path less traveled showed nary a trace that anyone had passed. This un- tainted majesty of winter off the beaten Trail goes unmatched in the total scheme of natures’ seasonal bounty, including our autumn color show. To carry beautiful viewing a bit farther, snow in general covers up a lot of the worlds’ ugliness. How lucky are we backwoods beings!                                                                                                                                                                                        
The season of joy and giving got off to a rambunctious start last week with the “Join Together” membership drive here at WTIP. As always, energies were in high gear as staff and volunteers put together a well-oiled program seeking year-end financial support for this shining beacon in the north.                                                                                                                                                         
Once again, members, both renewing and new, stepped up with their pledges to help see WTIP through the winter ahead. Five and one-half days, of both frivolity and yet serious commitments, netted the WTIP Staff and family of listeners hope and happiness for a bright 2018. From everyone at the station, congratulations and thanks to ALL that made it possible. What a Family!                                                                                                                                                                
For WTIP, this is Wildersmith, on the Gunflint Trail, where every day is great, as the symphony of cold stillness, reveals!
 
 

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Albert Bally in WWI uniform

Albert Bally's WWI Letters Home

On April 7, 1917, the United States responded to three years of uncertainty and aggression by declaring war on Germany. The U.S. was now a part of World War I. One month later, at age 20, Albert Bally left his college studies in Milwaukee to enlist in the U.S. Army. His letters home to Grand Marais over the next two years follow the highlights of America's World War I experience, from mobilizing an army of millions of men, to combat in the trenches, to the American occupation of Germany after Armistice Day in November of 1918. With directness and sometimes humor, Al's letters illuminate the challenges of communication and the suspense faced by American families who waited weeks for every precious letter to make it home.
 

WTIP's Sterling Anderson reads a sample of Albert Bally’s World War I letters each Friday at 9:45 a.m. on North Shore Morning. 

The most recently aired segment can be found at the bottom of this page.

Links to archived segments are provided below:

Part one, originally aired July 28.

Part two, originally aired August 4.

Part three, originally aired August 11.

Part four, originally aired August 18.

Part five, originally aired August 25.

Part six, originally aired September 1.

Part seven, originally aired September 8.

Part eight, originally aired September 15.

Part nine, originally aired September 22.

Part ten, originally aired September 29.

Part 11, originally aired October 6

Part 12, originally aired October 13

Part 13, originally aired October 20

Part 14, originally aired October 27

Part 15, originally aired November 3

Part 16, originally aired November 10

Part 17, originally aired November 17


Albert Bally was born in Bayfield, Wisconsin on August 10, 1896, the youngest child of Sam and Nancy Bally. Shortly thereafter, the Ballys moved to Grand Marais, where Sam opened a blacksmithing business. Al and his brother, Bill, and his sister, Blanche, grew up in Grand Marais, where they were some of the first high school graduates. Al began a degree in electrical engineering, but put his education on hold to volunteer for the U.S. Army when the United States entered the war. He served in France, Luxembourg, and Germany, and was wounded in October of 1918, before returning home in May of 1919. He achieved the rank of Corporal and served the entire war with Company C of the 107th Signal Battalion in the 32nd Division, a unit that received acclaim for its extensive combat experience.  

After returning to the U.S., Al finished his degree in electrical engineering and graduated at the top of his class, married Mary Landergott of Milwaukee, and took jobs in St. Louis and Chicago. Shortly thereafter, Al and Mary moved back to Grand Marais, where he took over his father's blacksmithing business. He remained in Grand Marais the rest of his life and was an active citizen in public affairs. Albert Bally passed away December 11, 1990, and is buried in the Maple Hill Cemetery.  


Albert Bally is profiled in the Cook County History Museum's new exhibit, On the Line: A Military History of Cook County. His entire collection of letters is transcribed and available to read in the exhibit, along with many of his photographs and some of his belongings from his service in Europe.

Photo courtesy of Cook County Historical Society archives.
 

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