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North Shore Morning

AM Community Calendar/photo by masochismtango on Flickr

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News & Information

News and information, interviews, weather, upcoming events, music, school news, and many special features. North Shore Morning includes our popular trivia question - Pop Quiz! The North Shore Morning program is the place to connect with the people, culture and events of our region!

 


What's On:

"Moon Over Buffalo" opens July 16 at Arrowhead Center for the Arts

“Moon Over Buffalo” is a comic play set in Buffalo, New York, in the 1950s and will open July 16 as part of the Grand Marais Playhouse Summer Festival. WTIP volunteer Mark Abrahamson spoke with Marcia Hyatt and Jan Healy of the Playhouse on North Shore Morning.  

For more information call 218-387-1284 or go to Arrowhead Center for the Arts.

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Annual Gunflint Trail Canoe Races set for July 15

The Gunflint Trail Canoe Races are an annual fundraiser for the Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department. WTIP volunteer Julie Carlson spoke with Bruce Kerfoot about the 2015 Gunflint Trail Canoe Races on North Shore Morning. 
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The Gunflint Trail Canoe Races are Wednesday, July 15, from 4 to 7:30 pm on the Gunflint Lodge waterfront.  All proceeds benefit the Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department.

Gunflint Lodge Waterfront
143 S. Gunflint Lake
Grand Marais, MN 55604

For more information contact:
Julie Henricksson, the Gunflint Trail Canoe Races Committee at 218-388-2246
 

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Foreclosure Prevention program offered through AEOA

The Arrowhead Economic Opportunity Agency (AEOA) is offering a Foreclosure Prevention Assistance Program to help homeowners explore options when facing a foreclosure situation. North Shore Morning host Julie Carlson spoke with Carol Gehrke of the AEOA on North Shore Morning.
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For more information contact:

Carol Gehrke
(218) 735-6826
(800) 662-5711 ext. 6826
carol.gehrke@aeoa.org
 

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"I Love You, You're Perfect! Now Change!" opens July 17 at Arrowhead Center for the Arts

"I Love You, You're Perfect! Now Change!" is a musical production opening Friday, July 17, at the Arrowhead Center for the Arts. WTIP volunteer Julie Carlson spoke with Mark Abrahamson, Rose Arrowsmith DeCoux, Jackson Nickolay, Karina Roth and Kay Costello on North Shore Morning. 
 
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The Grand Marais Playhouse presents the 2015 Summer Theater Festival opening this weekend.  "I Love You, You're Perfect! Now Change!" plays in repertory with "Moon Over Buffalo" from July 16 through August 9. More information is available from Sue at 387-1284, extension 2, or from the Grand Marais Playhouse website.

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Boreal chickadee

Field Notes: Boreal chickadee

Field Notes with Molly Hoffman can be heard every Thursday, Friday and Saturday morning between 8:00 and 10:00.  Support for Field Notes comes from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

(Photo by Julio Mulero on Flickr)

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Photo by Travis Novitsky

Dr. Seth Moore: Grand Portage hopes to study micropollutants in area waters

Dr. Seth Moore is Director of Biology and Environment with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa. 

The Grand Portage Reservation is located in the extreme northeast corner of Minnesota, on the North Shore of Lake Superior in Cook County. Bordered on the north by Canada, on the south and east by Lake Superior and on the west by Grand Portage State Forest, the reservation encompasses an historic fur trade site on scenic Grand Portage Bay.

The band engages in fisheries and wildlife research projects throughout the year, working with moose, wolves, fish, deer, grouse, and environmental issues. Dr. Moore appears regularly on WTIP North Shore Community Radio, talking about the band's current and ongoing natural resource projects, as well as other environmental and health related issues. 

In this segment, we’ll hear about a recent grant proposal to study micropollutants in bodies of water within the Grand Portage Trust Lands.

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Pluto from Chiron {Bill Lile /Flickr}

Northern Sky: July 12

Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota. She authors the Minnesota Starwatch column, and contributes to WTIP bi-weekly on the Monday North Shore Morning program through "Northern Sky," where she shares what's happening with stars, planets and more.

Dark skies with the new moon on the 15th; good viewing of several planets, especially with binoculars; NASA's New Horizons space craft flies by Pluto on July 14th.

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Gunflint Trail Historical Society 10 Year Celebration, picture by Sally Valentini

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 10

Summer has turned the corner so to speak as daylight minutes begin to trickle away. Conditions in the upper Gunflint have been fairly normal, but did present a sticky spike last weekend. A couple sultry days gets old quick, and they had a number of us folks reflecting our appreciation for colder times ahead (not that we are wishing our life away).

As I keyed this week's Gunflint scoop, storm clouds were building and thunder was rumbling in the west. A good soaking would be welcomed as rain over the past week or so has been on the scant side. Talking of storm clouds, they bring back memory of the infamous July 4 sixteen years ago when this territory saw hundreds of thousands of acres devastated in an unheard of derecho. The area has since bounced back with phenomenal new growth even when one factors in wildfires in some of the same blowdown places during 2005, 2006 and the tragic 2007 inferno. In spite of marvelous recovery efforts by “Mother Nature,” with assistance from mankind, many places remain with a substantial risk-laden fuel load, keeping all of us on edge when it gets dry. So let it rain, but no blowing!

Blueberry pickers are anxious to hit the patches in search of their treasured nuggets. An early report relates it’s still a little early, with fruit on the plants, but more ripening time needed.

I heard of a recent wild woods encounter involving a moose, her calf and a hungry bear. The scene was observed by a fishing party up on Lake Saganaga, who during the episode turned out to be life savers. Things began to unfold as the fisher-people heard a crashing through the woods. Thinking it was probably a moose rambling through the timber they were surprised when a moose calf bolted out along the shore and jumped into the lake. It began swimming away from shore in a frantic state. Momma moose appeared along shore but did not enter the water, choosing to lumber along shore as her baby floundered further away from land. In a matter of moments, “brother” bear came onto the scene following the youngster right into the water.

To the observers, it was soon perceived the bear would out-swim the moose baby and sure enough, caught up in no time. The big “Bruno” was on the little one, grappling and pushing it under water time and time again. The ungulate toddler scrambled furiously against both the bear and perils of drowning. Meanwhile Momma could do nothing from her shoreline position and eventually meandered off into the forest, probably figuring her young’un was a lost cause. Knowing moose calves have a hard time surviving, even on land, the fisherman navigating the boat decided an attempt should be made to try and save this little guy/gal. The boat was started and headed directly for the splashing fiasco.

Miraculously, as the craft got close, this tactic diverted the bear's attention on the prey and it backed off. Apparently discouraged by the interruption, it headed back to shore, disappearing into the woods. Talk about good Samaritans! Further observation of the calf following this melee saw the frightened critter making its way back to shore. It shook itself off, amazingly none the worse for wear, seemingly uninjured. After gaining some composure, and in a bit of wonderment, it turned its head for a look at these rescuers as if to acknowledge the heroic act on its behalf.

A happy ending to this extraordinary wilderness experience occurred later as the calf gave out a few whimpering wails and Momma returned the call. Soon Momma reappeared and the family was reunited. What a sensational effort by these concerned and creative Gunflint neighbors!

A swell gathering at the Seagull Lake Community center last Sunday closed down the July 4 Holiday break. Those in attendance celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Gunflint Trail Historical Society and the fifth full year of the organization's Chik-Wauk Museum. A brief program followed the social hour and dinner with past presidents reminiscing about this splendid Gunflint Community accomplishment. See a digital of the goings-on with the Wildersmith website posting at WTIP.org.

Closing for this week, a couple reminders are extended to area residents and visitors. The July meeting of the Gunflint Trail Historical Society happens this coming Monday, the 13. The gathering will be at the Schaap Community Center (Mid-Trail) beginning at 1:30 pm.

Of additional importance, it’s “feelin’ groovy” time here at WTIP as the station is in the midst of its summer membership drive. If you’re wantin’ to feel groovy, how better to accomplish such than to get on board without delay. Continued quality programming costs big bucks, so join or renew now to help the cause. Give us a call at 387-1070 or 1-800-473-9847 or click and join at WTIP.org!

Oops it’s Canoe Race time on the Gunflint. See you there next Wednesday.

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Superior National Forest Update: July 10

Hi.  I’m Becky Bartol, environmental coordinator, with this week’s edition of the National Forest Update -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Superior National Forest. For the week of July 10th, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.
It has been a week of beautiful weather on the Forest.  We hope that you’ve been able to get outside and enjoy some of the sun.  This past Tuesday was national “Father-Daughter Take a Walk Day”, so hopefully some fathers and daughters were out hiking in the woods.   If you somehow missed that holiday, you can cheer yourself up by celebrating National Blueberry Muffin Day this Sunday.
Camping can be a great way to get outdoors, but remember that if you are planning on camping, it is not allowed to ‘claim’ a spot by putting your gear at a campsite ahead of time.  Your campsite must be occupied the first night.  Camping gear left in an unoccupied site may be confiscated, and the owner can actually be cited for a violation.  If you are concerned about not having a site, many of the sites on our campgrounds are reservable online at Recreation.gov. 
Sites in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness are, of course, not reservable.  When planning your route, develop alternatives in case the site you are hoping for is occupied.  Creating your own campsite on islands or other places is not allowed, and you can be cited for camping outside of the designated sites.  The reason we have designated sites is to concentrate the impact of camping in only those spots, leaving the rest of the shoreline pristine.  Help us protect the Boundary Waters by following the rules and guidelines - they are there for good reasons.
Getting to your campground or entry point should be pretty easy.  Our roads are in good shape, and there are only a few timber sales creating truck traffic.  You may encounter logging trucks on the Dumbbell River Road, Wanless Road (heading to Hwy.1), Sawbill Landing Road, Lake County 7 near Harriet Lake, the Four Mile Grade near Wilson Lake, The Grade, and the Sawbill Trail.
While most of us are enjoying summer, some of us have been preparing for winter already.  The Forest Service, in partnership with the Arrowhead Coalition for Multiple Uses, has been working to develop the South Fowl Snowmobile Trail near South Fowl Lake.  This section of trail should be ready for snowmobile use this winter, so thanks to all the trail workers that are out there feeding the mosquitos and black flies this summer.
Smokey Bear would like to pass on a big thank you for the warm welcome he received at the Fourth of July parade in Tofte.  He was able to both give and receive a lot of bear hugs, and there’s nothing he likes better.  Being Smokey, he’d also wants us to remind you to be careful with fire and make sure all your campfires are dead out before you leave your campsite.
Have a great weekend, and enjoy the Forest.  Until next week, this has been Becky Bartol with the Superior National Forest Update. 
 

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Cobblestone structures in Tofte Park

West End News: July 9

I was surprised and honored to be named Citizen of the Year at this year’s 4th of July celebration in Tofte.  As I said in my acceptance speech, off the top of my head I can think of 20 people that deserve the honor more than I do.  I am pleased to receive the same award that my mother, Mary Alice Hansen, won couple of years ago.  It seems like whenever I do something that either of my parents did previously, I’m on the right track.
 
During the plaque ceremony, Tofte Township Supervisor, Jim King, mentioned that the Citizen of the Year Award was created seven years ago to honor Tofte resident and volunteer, Bob Boomgard.  I was saddened to hear Jim say that Bob had passed away recently.
 
Bob Boomgard retired to Tofte many years ago and quickly became one of the most active volunteers that one can imagine.  He did many things, but his first love was the beautiful Tofte Park. 
 
Tofte Park is one of the North Shore’s hidden gems – a beautiful swath of Lake Superior shoreline that was bypassed by the modern reconstruction of Highway 61.  Originally donated to the township by Elizabeth Tofte in 1922, the park featured a quaint spillway, wishing well and walking bridge, all built out of red, white and blue cobblestones.
 
By the early 1990s, the cobblestone structures were in considerable disrepair.  Bob, along with his wife, Delora, painstakingly recovered all the fallen cobblestones and restored the lovely structures to their original glory.  We all enjoy his work every time we stroll through the park and the township has been inspired to make a number of improvements to the park over recent years.  It is now a popular spot for weddings and picnics – not to mention the famous 4th of July celebration.
 
Bob Boomgard will be greatly missed in Tofte, not only for his hard work, but his invariably cheerful and upbeat personality.
 
It is good to see that the 600 Road bridge across the Temperance River in Tofte is finally funded for replacement.  The old iron bridge, whose paint had faded to a charming pink color over the years, has been closed for almost a year, effectively cutting off reasonable access to the 600 Road.  The 600 Road is not only important to local loggers, but is a popular tourism destination, especially in the fall when its abundant maples put on a spectacular show.
 
In a very enlightened move, the Forest Service has designed an aesthetically pleasing wooden bridge that will blend with the beauty of the river - and will be constructed by a local contractor.
 
It remains a mystery as to why the replacement wasn’t done before the inconvenience of having the road closed for a year, but I guess it is a case of better late than never.
 
Here is a quick list of “not to be missed” West End events that are coming up in the next month:
 
The Bloodmobile will be at Zoar Lutheran Church in Tofte on Tuesday, July 21, from 2 until 6 pm.  Call Polly Erickson at 663-7398 if you would like to donate a pint of blood.
 
On Saturday, July 18, Barb Livdahl will be speaking about the current exhibit called “Lost Resorts” at the Cross River Heritage Center in Schroeder.   She’ll be sharing what she learned while researching all the resorts that existed in the West End from the 1920s through today.
 
Sugarloaf Cove Nature Center in Schroeder has a fun plan for their annual meeting this year.  They will be celebrating aboard the tour ship Voyageur on Saturday, August 8, embarking from the Silver Bay Marina at 5:30 pm.   If seeing Sugarloaf from the big lake isn’t enough, their will be hors d’oeuvres, wine and live music from the THUGS, which stands for Two Harbors Ukelele Group.
 
We’ve been chasing a lost dog around the woods here at Sawbill for the last two weeks.  The husky mix named Bode, ran off from his owners during a thunderstorm in the BWCA Wilderness just north of Sawbill.  Bode is a recent rescue by his family so he hadn’t bonded completely with them yet.
 
He is spotted around the area almost every day and will readily eat food that is left out for him, but won’t let anyone get close enough to capture him.  The owners are coming back up from their home in the Twin Cities today with a large live trap that we’re all hoping will do the trick. 
 
Stay tuned, for what we’re all hoping will be the happy conclusion to the saga of Bode next week.
 

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