Listen Now
Pledge Now


 
 

DayBreak

Photo by Carah Thomas-Maskell

  • Monday 7-8am
  • Tuesday 7-8am
  • Wednesday 7-8am
  • Thursday 7-8am
  • Friday 7-8am
Genre: 
Variety
Join Jay Andersen and Gary Atwood for a program packed with news, music and some humor.  Listener favorites like For the Birds, The Environment Report, Morning Business Report, and The Predator Moment provide a regular foundation for this program that also covers politics, local news and issues, and, the funnier side to the news. DayBreak airs 7-8 a.m. on weekdays.

What's On:
Ann Ward unloads a kiln full of bowls for the upcoming fundraiser/photo by Joan Farnam

Empty Bowls fundraiser draws attention to growing demand for food support

AttachmentSize
Finalcut_EmptyBowls_20101110.mp34.93 MB

Empty Bowls, an international event to raise money to fight hunger while promoting art and community action, takes place at the First Congregation Church in Grand Marais this coming Thursday. Artists, community members, and students at every school in the county came together to make bowls and to help support our local food shelf.

On the Monday before the annual Empty Bowls event in Grand Marais down to the wire preparations are underway at the Art Colony. With just a few days to go, volunteers work tirelessly to get things done. Ann Ward is a potter and volunteer for the event she says the last week has been full of back to back kiln firings and community glazing workshops, “It’s been a lot of pretty busy days and nights,” says Ward.

Ward has personally thrown more than 100 bowls for the event. In addition to her own work, she’s helped many other folks in the community with making their own creations for the fundraiser.

Shining a light on hunger in our community is more important than ever. The number of folks seeking help has skyrocketed in the last year. Jan Parish works for the county’s Health and Human Services Department and had been taking a close look at the numbers of people seeking food support. She says, “We’ve seen a great increase in our case load. We’ve started tracking the caseloads from 2006 through 2010 on a chart and the numbers that we see in 2010 are at least double the 2006 and 2007 numbers.”

To be exact, the county has seen an increase of 130 percent in the last year. Overall the state of Minnesota has seen a greater demand for food support since the onset of the economic downturn, but the local growth in need surpasses the state-wide growth by percentage. “State-wide,” says Parish, “the increase for September, comparing that to 2005, is 86 percent. So actually Cook County has seen a little higher increase in the food support need than state-wide.”

The increase in demand for assistance doesn’t stop at the county’s Health and Human Services Department. It’s the same story at the local food shelf. Amy Demmer is the director of the Art Colony in Grand Marais, which right now could be well described as Empty Bowls central. Most of what needs to get done to pull the event off locally happens right at the Art Colony. Demmer says she and other folks on the Empty Bowls committee gathered data on the need in our community. “What we found,” says Demmer, “is that last year we were saying that 75 families in our community use the food shelf from month to month and that had increased from 50 families the year before. Now it’s 100 kids and 160 adults that are using the food shelf every month.”

Demmer is fired up about this year’s event and that’s not just because her office sits right above the Art Colony’s kiln. “We have people in our community that are hungry,” says Demmer, “and it’s not this abstract thing of you know people hungry in Africa—there’s people hungry here in Cook County. You know 10 percent of the people in our county, over 500 people, use some sort of food support program every month…and that doesn’t even address those that remain silent in their need.”

Demmer says she hopes the event helps address the silence and stigma surrounding the issue of hunger. “One of the really interesting facts we found out is that for every $5 in food support it generates $9.20 in economic activity for our community,” says Demmer. “That’s a really powerful figure that says when people spend that it creates economic activity in our community and that says that this is a really good thing for our community,” Demmer concludes.

Empty Bowls is this Thursday, Nov. 11. This year, there will be both a lunch seating from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and a dinner seating from 5 to 7 p.m. at the First Congregational Church in Grand Marais. Between then and now you can bet the kiln at the Art Colony will be going non-stop. But for Grand Marais Potter and event volunteer Joan Farnam, the big pay off comes when the public gets a look at all the hand-crafted pots, “Well I’ll tell you what,” says Farnam, “for me personally there’s nothing like seeing a table full of bowls that the community has made, that are beautiful, and are donated to help other people. I love it!”

A bowl of soup costs $10, but you keep the bowl and the money raised goes to the Cook County Food Shelf.

Program: 

 
Election results

WTIP Election Night Roundup

The election turnout in Cook County was once again large with 77 percent of registered voters casting their ballots. The highest turnout was in Cascade Precinct 7 with 89 percent of the eligible voters voting.
 

The Cook County Schools ISD166 Operating Levy Referendum won approval from voters. The final vote total was 1,487 yes and 1,336 no.
 
In county commissioner contests, incumbent Janice Hall kept her District 1 seat defeating Bill Hennessy 315 to 134. In Commissioner District 3 Sue Hakes defeated Lloyd Speck 361 to 261. In the 5th District it was incumbent Bruce Martinson winning over Diane Parker 387 to 215.
 
The Grand Marais mayoral race saw write-in candidate Larry “Bear” Carlson defeat former mayor Mark Sandbo with 329 votes to Sandbo's 308. For city council the two winners were Bob Spry with 357 votes and incumbent Bill Lenz with 355 votes. Dave Palmer placed third with 332 votes.
 
For ISD166 school board, Mary Sanders ran unopposed in District 3 and got 463 votes. Jeanne Anderson got 328 votes in District 5. Challenger Michael O’Phelan had dropped out of the race but his name remained on the ballot and he got 217 votes. In ISD166 District 1, Deb White pulled 298 votes to Andrew Warren’s 116.

The 6th District Court race went to Mike Cuzzo, who topped Tim Costly with 60 percent of the vote. Locally the breakdown was a bit different with Tim Costly getting slightly more votes than Mike Cuzzo (1,283 to 1,240).
 
DFL 8th Congressional Rep. Jim Oberstar was defeated by Republican challenger Chip Cravaak. In Cook County however, Oberstar took more votes than Cravaak receiving 1,606 votes to Cravaak’s 1,152.
 
In Cook County, 6th District DFL State Sen. Tom Bakk easily defeated Republican Jennifer Havlick 1,910 to 923. He won district-wide. In Cook County, District 6A DFL Rep. David Dill handily defeated Republican Jim Tuomala 1,911 to 873. He also won district-wide.
 
The governor’s race Mark Dayton has a narrow lead of less than 10,000 votes over Republican Tom Emmer. The race may be headed for a recount as Minnesota law requires all ballots to be recounted if the margin of victory is less than one half of 1 percent of all votes tallied. In this case, a vote difference of around 11,000 or less would likely trigger a recount. Cook County gave the nod to Democrat Mark Dayton 1,673 votes over Republican Tom Emmer’s 878 and Independence Party candidate Tom Horner’s 292.

In the Secretary of State race, Cook County voted for Democrat Mark Ritchie over Republican Doc Severson. Ritchie won state-wide.
 
For State Auditor, Cook County went for Democrat Rebecca Otto over Republican Pat Anderson. Otto won state-wide.
 
For Attorney General, Cook County chose Democrat Lori Swanson over Republican Chris Barden. Swanson won state-wide.

All local election results are unofficial until certified by the canvass board on Friday, Nov. 5.

Check out a county-wide breakdown of the results.

Program: