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Join Jay Andersen and Sterling Anderson for a program packed with news, music and some humor.  Listener favorites like For the Birds, The Environment Report, Morning Business Report, and The Predator Moment provide a regular foundation for this program that also covers politics, local news and issues, and, the funnier side to the news. DayBreak airs 7-8 a.m. on weekdays.

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Superior National Forest Update: April 28

Hi. I’m Joe Mundell, timber sale administrator, with the National Forest Update for April 28 - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For the end of April, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.

After some beautiful weekend weather, things seem to have taken a turn back toward winter. The recent rain, ice, and snow storm has left the roads in the forest in not the best of shape. Rain-soaked roadways are not stable, and in places on less traveled back roads, it is like driving in pudding. Please avoid these areas – you could easily get stuck, and you’ll also leave permanent ruts for the summer. If the road isn’t thawed into pudding, it is probably very icy. Until the sun thaws off the ice, you can expect hazardous driving. After the sun has been out, you’ll still have to drive cautiously because you’ll run into icy patches on the north slope of hills, or where the road is shaded by trees. The ice and snow have also caused some minor fallen branches, and the occasional major one. This weekend promises higher winds, so some bigger trees whose root system has been loosened by the rain may be falling as well. The roads are still under spring weight restrictions, so there should be limited truck traffic in the woods.

The weather has moved back to wintry, and some of our migrating birds have reversed course as well. Migration is stalled out right now, and there are some indications that there is reverse migration happening as birds temporarily move southwards to where there are more insects to eat. It’s only temporary though. We expect that with the next southerly flow of air, birds will be riding the wave of warmth, headed north once again.

Human visitors to our Forest will also be headed north soon. They will find that our campgrounds are coming back on line, one by one. Rustic campgrounds are open for use, and the fee campgrounds are becoming fully open as we are able to open water systems. Once fully open with water and garbage services, the fee campgrounds will start collecting fees, prior to that you may camp without a fee. Usually all the fee campgrounds are fully open and in fee status by around May 15.

Monday, May 1, is the beginning of the quota season for the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. You need a permit for the Boundary Waters all year, but during the winter you can use a self-issued permit available at entry point kiosks. During the quota season you can still use those self-issued permits for day use, but starting on May 1, overnight users must use a permit issued at a ranger district office or at one of our cooperators, and pay the associated fee. The fees help us maintain portages and campsites and the permits help to maintain the wilderness character of the land by distributing visitors more evenly in time and space. More information about Boundary Waters permitting, including information on motor permits and exempt permits, can be found on our website or at our offices. Also starting May 1, our offices will be open seven days a week, but with the same hours of 8 to 4:30. The Isabella work station will remain closed this year.

Last, but not least, starting next week, this Update will be aired every week instead of every other week. Take advantage of this short time between using the snowblower and the lawnmower to go for a hike this weekend, or just enjoy the new birds of the season at the feeder. Until next time, this has been Joe Mundell with the Superior National Forest Update.

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Superior National Forest Update: February 17

Hi. This is Patrick Krage, Engine Module Leader, Engine 621, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior National Forest. For February 17th, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.

With temperatures in the forties and rain forecast for this weekend, skiing and snowmobiling don’t sound very appealing. But, there is one activity this weekend which you can participate in from the comfort of a chair by the window with a cup of coffee in your hand. This weekend is the annual “Great Backyard Bird Count.” This is a national citizen science effort to track on winter bird populations, and the Forest Service uses the data for monitoring our local birds. The Audubon Society is the organizer of the event, and it is easy to record what you see at your feeders on line, as well as see who else is reporting on birds in your area. Just search for Great Backyard Bird Count on the web to get started, or look for the link on the Superior’s Facebook page and our website.

Our changing winter weather has also seen an increase in a newer form of recreation: Fat tire biking. Fat tire biking can be a great way to get out in the winter, but we are becoming aware of a growing number of bikers and cross country skiers who have been using area snowmobile trails. These trails are not designed for use by skiers or cyclists, and the mix of snowmobiles, skiers, and cyclists on the same trail presents a safety hazard for everyone. Contact a Forest Service office for information on locations where winter biking is appropriate, and for locations of our cross country ski trails.

The alternating warm and cold spells have been hard on our forest roads. During the warm times, watch for soft shoulders and even soft spots in the roadway itself. In the cold, ice has been an issue as snow melts or packs down into some really slippery areas. All this means that regardless of the weather, slow down going around corners because you don’t know what the road conditions will be like up ahead. As always with driving, be defensive and prepare for the worst.

There is some winter timber harvesting going on as well. On the Tofte District, watch for logging traffic on the Trappers Lake Road, Cook County 3, the Sawbill Trail, the Honeymoon Trail, and the Grade. On the Gunflint, expect traffic on the Firebox Road and Greenwood Road.

If you do stop in at the Tofte Ranger Station, you’ll see a new face as district ranger. Lenore Lamb will be filling in behind Kurt Steele for a few months. Stop by and say hi, but she’s coming to us from Rhinelander, Wisconsin, so watch what you say about the Packers. Also, if you are planning on visiting any of our ranger stations, remember that this Monday is President's Day and federal offices will be closed.

Enjoy the woods, or enjoy sitting counting birds from the comfort of your home. Either way, have a great week. This has been Patrick Krage with the Superior National Forest Update.

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Superior National Forest Update: January 6

Hi. This is Steve Robertsen, forest interpreter, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior National Forest. For January 6th, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.

It may be cold, but we do have snow! That’s great news for all of us winter recreation enthusiasts, whether you like going out on a snowmobile, skis, dogsled, snowshoes, toboggan, or all of the above. Winter trails are currently being groomed for various uses across the Tofte and Gunflint Ranger Districts. Our trails are maintained through the coordinated efforts of dedicated volunteer organizations and the Superior National Forest. These volunteer organizations work very hard on our trails to offer quality recreation experiences and we ask all listeners to respect their efforts by following the rules of the trail. For example, a trail designated as a ski trail should not be used by individuals who are snowshoeing, hiking, or biking. Misuse of a trail can ruin the grooming for the intended use, spoil the experience for others, and make more work for our volunteers and our recreation crew. Help to preserve our trails for everyone by using only the trails which are designated for your activity. Remember too that off-trail is an option for many winter sports. The general Forest is open for most winter uses, though with some restrictions based on location and snow depth. If you have questions about where you can hike, bike, or snowshoe, please contact a Forest Service office for details.

Speaking of trail use, dog sleds will be out this Saturday for the annual Gunflint Mail Run. Keep an eye out for both participants and spectators if you are traveling on or near the Gunflint Trail. Good luck to all the mushers and the dogs!

If you’re traveling elsewhere, there are only a few places where you might encounter logging trucks. You may have truck traffic on the Sawbill Trail and the Grade on the Tofte District, while on the Gunflint District, trucks will be on the Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, and Trestle Pine Road.

When you are out on the trail, you may see some newer blue signs with letters and numbers on them. These are emergency location signs which refer to the National Grid system. If you have an emergency while on the trail, you can use the numbers on the sign like an address when you call 911 on a cell phone. Of course, it is unlikely that your emergency will happen right next to a sign, so you will probably have to backtrack to the last sign, or go ahead to the next one. There also might not be cell phone reception at the sign, so you’ll have to remember or write down the numbers, and then call it in where you have reception.

With all the trails to use, and all the winter activities, how can you not like northern Minnesota in January?! The Forest Service has two slogans right now, both of which have to do with enjoying our winter. The first is ‘Get Out There’ … so turn off the TV, close the chip bag, and put on a coat. The second is ‘Go Play’. No explanation necessary.

Until next time, this has been Steve Robertsen with the Superior National Forest Update, and I’ll see you on the trail!

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North Woods Naturalist: Varied weather and otters

Cold weather swings and not-the-usual suspects at the bird feeder.  WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with naturalist Chel Anderson about the winter so far.

(Photo by Amit Patel on Flickr)

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Jay Walljasper

Workshops offered to improve "walkability" of Grand Marais

The Cook County Chamber and Moving Matters are hosting two “Walkabout” workshops to explore the things that might be done to improve the “walkability” of Grand Marais. WTIP’s Jay Andersen spoke with Jay Walljasper, who’ll be leading the workshops.

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Superior National Forest Update: December 2

Hi. This is Brandee Wenzel, administrative support assistant, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior National Forest. For December 2nd, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.

Our website is all set for winter if the weather would cooperate. There are links from our recreation page to our trail partners who groom ski trails, and to other sources for ski and snowmobile trail information. We also have some tips for driving on winter roads for those of us who have forgotten what snow is like over the summer.

One reason to be out in your car in the forest is that it’s the season for harvesting holiday greenery! Tags for Christmas trees are available for five dollars at district offices, and, if you are in fourth grade, you are eligible for a free Christmas tree tag through the Every Kid In A Park program! When you are selecting a tree, there are some rules to keep in mind. Trees cannot be ‘merchantable timber,’ in other words, they need to be small trees, not just the top off a big tree. The maximum stump height you can leave behind is 12 inches. The best tree to cut from a forest point of view is balsam fir. They grow back readily, and in many places we are looking to actually decrease the number of fir trees. True pines grow back more slowly, so we’d like to keep the young pine in the forest. You are not allowed to cut white pine or cedar for Christmas trees.

Balsam boughs may be harvested for wreaths, though you will need a permit for this activity. Princess pine, which is actually an herbaceous plant called a club moss, is often used to decorate wreaths, but its harvest is not allowed on the Superior National Forest.

Speaking of cutting balsam fir, people may have noticed either a piece of equipment or a crew with brush saws working in several areas this past season to remove brush and balsam fir. These areas will be planted in the spring with white pine, white cedar, and yellow birch. The young trees will be protected from deer with cages. We are doing this along the North Shore where we are working with partners including the state, private landowners, and the North Shore Forest Collaborative to restore some of these
long-lived forest trees. You may have seen the material being hauled with ATVs along County Road 6 and 60, at Pincushion, and around Cascade State Park, the Onion River Road, and Hovland.

On a grander scale, you can expect trucks hauling larger trees on Trestle Pine Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Firebox Road, and Powers Lake Road. They are also using Blueberry Road, Rice Lake Road, Clara Lake Road, and the Honeymoon Trail. On the Tofte District, expect trucks on the Trappers Lake Road, Dumbell River Road, and Wanless Road. Use caution in these areas, especially with our wintery mix of road conditions including ice, mud, and slush.

Good luck to all in selecting the perfect tree, balsam bough, or just selecting the right road to travel. Enjoy the woods, and until next time, this has been Brandee Wenzel with the National Forest Update.

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Superior National Forest Update: November 18

Hi.  This is Chris Beal, Gunflint wildlife biologist, with this week’s National Forest Update -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior National Forest.  For the week of November 18th, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.
This is the last weekend of the rifle deer season, so wear your orange and be on the lookout for parked vehicles along roads.  While Sunday will be the end of the rifle season, bow hunting will continue, and the muzzleloader season will begin on the 26th.  Seasons for small game and grouse are also still open, so even after Sunday, orange is a good color while you’re out and about. 
Heavy snow is coming, and it is time to think about winter driving.  Plowing in the National Forest is done by state and county plows on state and county roads, and by private contractors on forest roads.  Many forest roads are unplowed in the winter.  If you are wondering if a road you are planning to travel is plowed, check with a Forest Service office.  While driving, if you run into a small Forest road which is plowed, be aware that this is usually an indicator that there may be logging activity up the road.  Watch for trucks!
In fact, watch for trucks particularly in these areas.  On the Tofte District, log hauling is taking place on Sawbill Landing Road near Sawbill Landing, the Dumbell River Road, Rice Lake Road, and Clara Lake Road. On Gunflint, expect trucks on the Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Blueberry Road, Firebox Road, Powers Lake Road, and Trestle Pine Road. 
With snow comes snowmobiling and skiing!  Snowmobiles are allowed to travel cross-country on the Forest and use unplowed roads if the snow depth is over four inches.  Travel on designated snowmobile trails also requires adequate snow cover, and that depth may vary between trails.  The DNR website is the best source of information on which state trails are officially open. 
For cross-country skiing, our website provides links to the websites of our trail partners who groom the trails.  This is your best source of information on trail conditions.  There are also maps of trail systems on our website.  These maps should not be considered to be totally accurate as trail locations may have shifted since the data was collected.  They will, however, give you a good indication of the extent and location of the trail system. 
If you are interested in getting outside and helping on a worthwhile project this weekend, the Northwoods Volunteer Connection is hosting a clean-up on The 600 Road (Forest Service Road 166) this Saturday, November 19th from 10 am to 1 pm. Volunteers will work to pick up litter along the roadside near the junction with the Sawbill Trail. The group will meet at the Tofte Ranger Station at 10 am and carpool to The 600 Road at 10:15 am. Gloves, safety equipment and lunch will be provided to volunteers.
Whether by car, truck, ski, or snowmobile, take it easy through this first round of winter until we are all used to it again.  We are switching to doing these updates every other week, so on behalf of the Superior National Forest, safe travels and have a wonderful Thanksgiving next week.  Until next time, this has been Chris Beal with the National Forest Update.

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Superior National Forest Update: November 11

Hi. This is Steve Robertsen, forest interpretation and education specialist, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior National Forest. For the week of November 11th, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.

We are in the middle of the firearms deer season. That means that there are lots of hunters out in the field, and a fair number of vehicles parked by the side of the road. Both are things to watch out for. If you are out in the woods this time of year, you need to be wearing orange and be aware of your surroundings. Hunters need to know that you may not discharge a firearm within 150 yards of a recreation site or trail, not including designated hunter walking trails. Hunting from vehicles and on the road is not legal. Also not legal is cross-country travel by ATV, so plan on doing some walking if you are hunting. People who are not hunting need to respect the hunters, and give them the room and quiet they need. If you are just out for a hike during these few weeks, consider hiking in an area where hunting is not allowed.

With the nice weather, people are extending their summer into November. If you are planning on camping or boating, know that the water is off in campgrounds, and the boat docks are out for the winter. Possibly more importantly, while outhouses are open, we don’t restock toilet paper during the off season. Be prepared! Prepare yourself in other ways too. It is not hard to get turned around in the woods when you are concentrating on something else, like hunting. Besides map and compass, there are excellent mapping apps available for smartphones which will help you find your way back to the car. They only work though if you’ve downloaded maps ahead of time, as there is little cell coverage out here, and if your battery is charged. Don’t rely only on having a smartphone or GPS as it is too easy to drop them or have their batteries run low.

While driving, there is some logging activity to be aware of, mostly in the same places as the last few weeks. On the Tofte District, trucks will be using the Sawbill Landing Road near Sawbill Landing, the Dumbell River Road, the Rice Lake Road, Clara Lake Road, and the Honeymoon Trail west of White Pine Lake. On the Gunflint, trucks are on the Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Powers Lake Road, and Trestle Pine Road. If you are planning to park your vehicle off the road while you go into the woods, be extra careful in these areas to make sure your vehicle is completely off the roadway so a truck can pass. Always park your vehicle in a safe location with good visibility.

Enjoy our extra dose of summer, and good luck hunting, whether it be with a rifle, or binoculars and camera. Until next time, this has been Steve Robertsen with the National Forest Update.

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Superior National Forest Update: October 28

Hi.  This is Brandee Wenzel, administrative support assistant, with this week’s National Forest Update -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior National Forest.  For the week of October 28th, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.

The Forest is really entering ‘winter hibernation’ mode now.  All campgrounds are in their winter status and the docks are gone from the boat landings.  Except for two pit piles, our fire crew is finished with all the pile burning that they have been doing, and their engines have been winterized and won’t be staffed again until spring.  We are also starting to see people out harvesting balsam boughs for holiday wreaths.  Remember, you need a permit for this. Personal use permits are free, but commercial use permits are based on the amount harvested.  If you’re out for firewood instead of balsam boughs, a permit is needed for that as well.  For both firewood and boughs, information covering what specifically you can harvest, where you can legally harvest, how you do the harvesting, and how much you’ll pay for the permit, is available online, or at the Tofte or Gunflint Ranger Stations.

We’ve had a lot of moose sightings by our crews in the woods this past week.  That’s a good sign, and everyone loves seeing the big animals.  Be careful though, it is easy to approach a moose too closely while trying to get a good photo.  Get your pictures from far enough away so as not to disturb the animal.

Trapping seasons for beaver, otter, mink, and muskrat open on October 29, and the deer firearm season opens on November 5.  Remember, for all firearms, whether you are hunting grouse or deer, you may not shoot unless you are at least 150 feet from a developed recreation site or road. 

Speaking of roads, if you are out driving, here’s where you can expect some logging traffic.  On the Tofte District, trucks will be using the Sawbill Landing Road near Sawbill Landing, the Dumbell River Road, the Rice Lake Road, Clara Lake Road, and the Honeymoon Trail west of White Pine Lake.  On the Gunflint, trucks are on the same roads as last week.  Harvest is taking place off of Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Powers Lake Road, and Trestle Pine Road.

This week was National Bat Week!  You may have seen the bat boxes on posts at our district offices and at some campgrounds.  If not, you may want to check out this “government subsidized housing” for bats.  In honor of Bat Week, we’ve put up signs under the boxes explaining more about what you can do to help our native flying bug zappers.    

Last, but not least, watch out for zombies, ghosts, vampires, and the occasional Disney princess on Monday.  Enjoy your weekend, and have a scary but safe Halloween!  Until next week, this has been Brandee Wenzel with the National Forest Update.
 

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