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Join Jay Andersen and Gary Atwood for a program packed with news, music and some humor.  Listener favorites like For the Birds, The Environment Report, Morning Business Report, and The Predator Moment provide a regular foundation for this program that also covers politics, local news and issues, and, the funnier side to the news. DayBreak airs 7-8 a.m. on weekdays.

What's On:

A Year in the Wilderness: April 1 - Water Testing

Cook County adventurers Dave and Amy Freeman are spending a year in the wilderness. On a regular basis they’ll be sharing some of their experiences traveling the BWCAW.

(Photo courtesy of Dave and Amy's Facebook page)

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Superior National Forest Update: March 25

Hi.  I’m Mary Ann Atwood, administrative support assistant on the Gunflint Ranger District, with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Gunflint and Tofte Districts of the Superior National Forest.
For late March and early April, here’s what’s happening on the Forest.
Spring brings a variety of changes from natural to regulatory. 
In the natural world, birds are migrating.
According to the American Bird Conservancy, the Superior National Forest is one of 100 globally important bird areas, an ideal location for bird-watching!
While in the Duluth area you may hear the Konka-ree spring song of the red wing blackbird as well as a symphony of other spring migrating species.  Along the north shore…the warblers will soon be on their way…
Birds, including eagles, that winter in the northland, are busy laying eggs or caring for their hatchlings.  The Highway 61 eagle’s nest just south of Grand Marais was lost in a recent wind storm, however the eagles are busy rebuilding in the same area.
The DNR reports active bears near Hibbing raiding bird feeders.  Might be a good time to quit feeding, or take your feeders inside at night unless you want to provide breakfast for a newly-awakened hungry bear.
Human activity also changes in the spring
While driving forest roads, be mindful of soft spots, eroded shoulders, and possible flooding from plugged culverts.  Please report any major problems on forest service roads to district offices.
Weight restrictions on gravel roads are in effect in both Lake and Cook Counties.  While some logging operations continue in the forest, logging trucks will NOT be on the roads. 
Spring brings changes: Fire & Ice
Ice houses on non-Canadian border waters should have been removed by March 21st.  Ice houses on Canadian border lakes need to be removed by March 31st.   
In southern Minnesota early ice out dates have been reported. That may or may not be the case for our northern lakes.  If the ice on your favorite lake was safe in March 2015, it may not be safe in March 2016.
2016 fishing licenses went into effect at the beginning of March. Check the DNR’s 2016 fishing regulations before heading out.  You can get a copy of the fishing regs at Forest District offices or on-line at mndnr.gov.
If attempting a last bit of winter fun - skiing or snowmobiling - you may encounter trees and branches have fallen across trails.  Deadfalls may not be cleared for several weeks.
Spring weather means the Forest Service will no longer be grooming the George Washington Pines cross country ski trail system.
Snow depths in the forest range from non-existent to DEEP.  Timber crews, working 20 miles inland, report snow depths of two feet and continue to wear snowshoes as they accomplish their tasks.   
The DNR started burning restrictions in the central part of the state on March 21st.  As of this recording, burning is still permitted in Lake and Cook Counties.  Check with the DNR or a Forest Service office for current restrictions before you burn.
In the immortal words of Yogi Bera, when describing changes in spring weather, “It was a dry rain.”
Until next time, this has been Mary Ann Atwood with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: March 11

Hi. This is Chris Beal, wildlife biologist on the Gunflint District, with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For the beginning of March, here’s what’s happening on the Forest.

The main story on the forest this week is the end of winter and the beginning of the mud season. Winter recreation is coming to an end as snow melts and ground is exposed, and yet it still isn’t warm enough for most of our summer fun to begin. It is a good time of year though to go on a wander through the woods looking for signs of spring. The chickadees are singing spring songs, there’s a smell of moist earth in the air, and on a sunny day, you can tell that summer is just around the corner. Beware though, winter is still here on this side of the corner. It is actually easy to become hypothermic this time of year. People dress optimistically for the warmth of the middle of the day, but the temperature can drop quickly. Damp air and rain can cool a person much faster than dry winter air and snow, so your body may actually lose heat faster than in midwinter. Be aware that it ain’t summer yet, and dress according to what the weather is, not what you are hoping it will be.

Lakes are very slushy, and even if fish houses do not have to come off the lakes yet, it is a good idea to get them off early. The DNR has set a date of March 21st for most of the Forest, and March 31st for the Canadian border waters, but given the slushy conditions, it may be hard to haul houses off the lake by those dates. Be sure to check ice thickness before you venture onto the ice, particularly if you are using any equipment to move your fish house.

If lakes are slushy, roads are icy. Compacted snow on roads has changed to ice in many areas, and the clear portions of roads are very soft and muddy. Cook County has imposed seasonal weight restrictions due to the soft roadways, and shoulders of roads are becoming particularly untrustworthy. Some of our field going personnel have reported that there are many stretches of roadway where they’ve been forced to travel at 20 miles per hour or below due to the combination of ice and soft roadways. The weight restrictions do mean that there won’t be any timber hauling going on, so you shouldn’t have to worry about logging traffic.

If you are trying to squeeze a little more winter in, and decide to go skiing or snowmobiling, be prepared for the conditions. 4 inches of snow cover are required to legally run a snow machine cross country, and we are running out of snow fast. On trails, remember that it is easy to damage soft trails in the spring, and if you want nice trails next winter, you should treat them carefully now. It is harder for a skier to damage a trail, but skiers need to watch out for the trail damaging the skier. Trails in spring can be icy and fast, and when you are coming down a hill at top speed and hit a patch of bare ground at the bottom, you come to an abrupt stop. Through the years, several people have discovered that this is an easy time of year to break your leg.

If mud season is starting to sound pretty dangerous and gloomy, don’t forget that it is also the time of returning life to the forest. Eagles are on eggs, ravens are flying around with sticks in their beaks, and birds are starting to sing. It is great time to be outside, just be careful how you get there!

Until next time, this has been Chris Beal with the National Forest Update.

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Superior National Forest Update: February 26

Hi.  I’m Patrick Krage, assistant fire engine captain, with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For late February, here’s what’s happening on the Forest.
The variety of weather we’ve had, from biting cold to almost balmy, from snow to rain, has really impacted all forms of recreation, and work, on the Forest.  There is a lot of slush on the lakes, and in subfreezing temperatures, it will freeze to snowmobile tracks or cross country skis as soon as it gets exposed to air.  One way to deal with this on a sled is to go faster, but the faster you go, the harder it is to see dangerous thin ice, or to stop when you do see it.  Give yourself extra space around possible danger zones at lake outlets and inlets and look for other signs of thin ice.  A friend was telling me about seeing an otter appear on the lake, and realizing that the otter’s sudden arrival meant there must be a hole through the ice in that location.   Also, keep an ear open for ice house removal dates.  They are coming up sooner than you might think. 
Off the lakes though, the trails are in pretty decent shape.  While we’ve had some thaws, they’ve usually been followed by a little snow, so ski trails are good.  Most snowmobile trails are good as well, but some may be rough where slushy snow has refrozen into bumps.  We are asking for a little help on wilderness portage trails though.  Some portages are still blocked by trees downed in the December ‘snow-down’ storm.  We don’t want you to clear trails, but if you are out in the Boundary Waters, please note what the conditions are on any portages you cross.  Photos would be particularly useful.  Reports and photos can be sent to the Tofte and Gunflint email addresses listed on our website, or taken to our offices.  This information will be used as we plan for trail clearing during the summer season.
As far as work in the Forest is concerned, warm weather has kept some swampy areas soft, making it hard for timber harvesting equipment to move in the winter.  This caused a break in timber activity, but this week, things have picked up again.  On the Gunflint District, visitors should expect logging traffic on the Greenwood Lake Road, Gunflint Trail, northern end of the Bally Creek Road, and The Grade.  On the Tofte District, logging traffic can be expected on the Honeymoon Trail, Caribou Trail, and Clara Lake Road.  Some of these roads are very narrow and winding.  Drive slowly and attentively; log trucks don’t stop on a dime, and they generally don’t back up long distances for passenger cars.  There are also ongoing state logging operations using some of these roads, which may add to the traffic. 
There is actually a little fire news as well.  The DNR is adjusting the burning permit season due to lack of snow cover in some areas and warm temperatures.  It seems odd to think about fire in February, but if you are looking to burn brush piles, you should do it sooner rather than later as there may be an early start to the fire season this year.  Check on permit needs, keep the fire in a clear area away from other flammable material, and never leave a fire unattended, even in winter.
With spring coming up fast, these next few weeks may be the final weeks to really get out and enjoy winter.  So, hit the trails, and until next time, this has been Patrick Krage with the National Forest Update.

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Superior National Forest Update: February 12

Hi.  I’m Joe Mundell, timber sale administrator, with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For mid-February, here’s what’s happening on the Forest.
Since December, we’ve been talking about clearing trails of fallen trees from that month’s heavy snow event.  While a majority of designated ski and snowmobile trails have been cleared with a huge amount of help from supporting trail organizations and clubs, there are many miles of unplowed back roads used by snowmobiles which remain blocked.  We continue to work on tree removal, but for now, it is still a good idea to check with District offices before you head out to see if your choice of route has been cleared. 
Our winter wilderness rangers report that conditions on lakes are pretty bad.   There’s a deep layer of slush under the snow which makes snowshoeing or skiing difficult.  Our current cold snap should freeze that slush, but if it is well insulated by snow cover, it could take a while to freeze.  Until it does, people venturing out onto the ice should pack extra socks and be prepared in case you get your feet wet.  Wet socks at ten below go beyond uncomfortable and into the danger zone, so throw some extra socks and even a towel into your backpack.
Off the lakes though, this should be an excellent week for skiing.  The snow is nice and firm and fairly new, and the temperature is perfect if you are dressed for it.  If you’re out skiing, snowshoeing, or snowmobiling, you might run into a Forest Service employee asking you to take a visitor use survey.  This is a national survey, and your input is an important part in the creation of an accurate picture of how the Superior is used for recreation.  We’d really appreciate it if you can take the time to take the survey.  It will help us better manage the Forest, and in the long run that will help you as well.
Our days are noticeably longer now, and the sun is much warmer than it was in December, but for deer and moose, this is a hard time of year as the food supplies continue to dwindle.  Whether it is because of salt on the roads, plants along the roadside, or just that sunrise and sunset are aligning with commute times, there are plenty of deer near or on roads right now, so keep a sharp eye out.  There are plenty of deer that have been hit on the sides of the roads as well, which means you also have to watch out for the low flying crows, ravens, and eagles doing the clean-up.  If you’re lucky, you may even see a wolf or two getting in on the free meal.
As you drive in the Forest, you may have to deal with deer and eagles and other animals in the road, but this week you won’t have to deal with many log trucks.  There are only a few timber sales going on with truck traffic.  On the Gunflint District, log hauling is taking place on FR144 (Old Greenwood), Shoe Lake Road, Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Bally Creek Road, Caribou Trail, Ball Club Road, and the Grade.  There’s no hauling taking place on the Tofte District right now.
So, between the light truck traffic, the longer days, and the good weather, this will be an excellent couple of weeks to get outside and play in the Forest.  Enjoy it, and until next time, this has been Joe Mundell with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: January 29

Hi.  I’m Chris Beal, wildlife biologist, with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For the end of January, here’s what’s happening on the Forest.
Work continues clearing trails and roads from our December ‘snow-down’ storm, but most of our trails are now open thanks to a lot of dedicated trail volunteers, partners, and our own trail crew.  If you’re snowmobiling or skiing though, be aware that many trails are not open to their full normal width, and you need to be aware that you may hit a narrow spot on the other side of the hill.  If you’d like to lend a hand and help out with this effort, contact Jon Benson at either the Gunflint or Tofte Ranger District, and he’ll find the right activity for you or your group.
In the last update, we talked about reporting lynx sightings and we’d like to thank the people that have seen lynx and reported the sighting.  We biologists though are doing more than just looking for lynx, we’ve been collecting scat.  It’s not that we are so interested in lynx poop – we are interested in the lynx DNA which can be recovered from scat.  The DNA allows to tell which animal has been where, and also how the animals are related.  All of this is helping us determine if we have a healthy population of lynx here on the Forest.
There will also be lots of dog tracks in the woods starting Sunday.  Leaving those tracks will be the dog and sleds competing in the John Beargrease Sled Dog Race.  Watching the mushers pass at a road crossing is always an exciting event.  If you’re planning on being a spectator, we ask that you take care in how you park your car on the road.  You need to leave enough space for possible log trucks to pass your car safely, but also beware of ditches that are filled with snow and may look like a firm surface.
Which roads may have those log trucks?  On the Gunflint District, log hauling is taking place on FR144 (Old Greenwood), Shoe Lake Road, Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Pine Mountain Road, Bally Creek Road, Caribou Trail, Ball Club Road, and the Grade.   Less is going on in Tofte this week.  Hauling will be taking place on the Tomahawk Road, probably beginning this weekend.  There will also be log trucks on the Honeymoon Trail, traveling between the Caribou Trail and the Poplar River area.
Best of luck to all the mushers in the race!  And whether you are racing, skiing, or just enjoying the winter scenery, have a great time out in the Forest.  Until next time, this has been Chris Beal with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update

Hi.  I’m Steve Robertsen, education specialist, with the National Forest Update -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For the second half of January, here’s what’s happening on the Forest.
There has been a lot of headway made in clearing roads and trail systems of the trees that fell during our ‘snow down’ event.  A three day effort cleared the Eagle Mountain trail, and the Banadad Trail is about half cleared, up to the yurt on the northern road.  But, trees continue to fall under the weight of snow which just doesn’t seem to be falling off the branches.  Even on routes which have already been cleared, you may find these “delayed” trees blocking your way.  In addition, roads and trails not open in the winter have not been cleared, so there will be more to do in the spring when they become accessible.    Travel safely.
If your reason for travel is to reach a lake for ice fishing, be sure to check the ice thickness.  The Boreal website has a good updated list of ice depth on many lakes, and it is widely variable.  There are only 3 in. of ice on some lakes, which is not safe for even foot travel.  The DNR recommends at least 4 in. of ice for foot travel, and 5 inches for a snowmobile.  If you do venture onto the ice, be prepared with ice picks to haul yourself out and a change of clothing you can leave on shore.  Better still, bring a friend with you.
You may be waiting for summer before you venture on to the lake.  This is the time of year to start planning Boundary Waters expeditions.  Reservations for entry points start on January 27th, so be sure to put that on your calendar.
Another date to put on the calendar is this next Monday.  It is Martin Luther King Day, and in his honor, government offices, including ours, will be closed.  It is a good day to reflect on how far our country has come in equal rights, and how much farther we still need to go.
One of the ongoing jobs of our biologists has been to monitor lynx populations.  We are learning more about this wild cat every year through radio collaring, scat collecting, and citizen observations.  If you see a lynx, or verifiable tracks, call or stop in at a Forest Service office and report the location to the biologist team.  We’d like to know.  If you have your camera or cell phone with, snap a picture too.  If you’re photographing tracks, put a coin or a ruler or your foot in the picture so the size can be estimated.
As for tracks being left by trucks, there is a little less log hauling on the Tofte District this week.  Forest users may see log trucks on The Grade (FR 170), the Sawbill Trail (CC2), the Trappers Lake Road (FR 369), and the west end of the Wanless Road (FR 172).    On the Gunflint side of things, log hauling is taking place on FR144 (Old Greenwood), Shoe Lake Road, Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Pine Mountain Road, Bally Creek Road, Caribou Trail, Ball Club Road, and the Grade.  Log trucks of course use Highway 61 as well, and I was reminded yesterday by a passing truck that I really need to check my washer fluid more often.
Whether you are skiing, snowmobiling, ice fishing, or just going for a drive in the woods, we hope you get out and enjoy your national forest during the next week.  Until next time, this has been Steve Robertsen with the National Forest Update.
 

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Superior National Forest Update: January 1

Hi.  I’m Steve Robertsen, education specialist, with the National Forest Update -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For mid-December, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.
We have finally gotten what most of us have been wishing for:  a good helping of snow!  But, it was wet and heavy, and brought down a lot of trees across trails and roadways, which wasn’t something any of us were wishing for.  Since the last edition of this update, there has been a lot of work done clearing Forest Service roads and by our trail partners clearing ski and snowmobile trails.  For the most part, plowed Forest Service roads are now cleared, but there are still a few spots being worked on.  Unplowed roads are not cleared yet, and it may be a while before all of them are.  Great headway has been made on trails, with an estimate of 75% of our ski trails now open.  Pincushion is mostly groomed, George Washington Pines is groomed, and trails at upper and central Gunflint are mostly there as well.  The trails at Flathorn/Gegoka near Isabella are partly groomed, but most of the trails are cleared and packed and good to ski on.
Winter conditions change more often than our radio updates, so for up to the minute information, go to our website, www.fs.usda.gov/superior and check the links from our recreation section to the people who are doing the grooming. 
On the roads going to your trail, you might encounter some logging traffic.  Log hauling is taking place on FR144 (Old Greenwood), Shoe Lake Road, Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Bally Creek Road, Caribou Trail, Ball Club Road, and the Grade.   Portions of Old Greenwood Road, Greenwood Road, and Firebox Road are also snowmobile trails, so be aware that there will be log trucks on segments of these trails when snowmobiling in this area.   There will also be log hauling on the Trapper’s Lake Road and Forest Road 170. 
The other traffic you might encounter on January 2 is from the annual Audubon Christmas Bird Count.  This is an international volunteer effort to count winter birds and track their numbers.  It is one of the largest and longest running citizen science projects, and the results are used in many scientific papers.  One ‘count circle’ is centered on Isabella, and there will be people with binoculars walking, skiing, snowshoeing, and driving in that area on the second, counting all the birds they can find.  It is a great project to be a part of, though it seems as though it always falls on the absolute coldest day of the year.
If you are already planning for the Boundary Waters next summer, be aware that the BWCAW limited entry points lottery opened December 16 and closes on January 12.  Reservations for BWCAW entry opens January 27.  If you can’t wait until summer, you can do some winter wilderness exploration with a self-issued permit available at most entry points, or at our offices, but make sure you do have a permit with you.  Our offices will be closed on January 1st, and then again on January 18, so plan accordingly
Take advantage of our snow while we have it, and get out on the trails.  Happy New Year to all, and until next time, this has been Steve Robertsen with the National Forest Update.   
 
 

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Superior National Forest Update: December 18

Hi.  I’m Steve Robertsen, education specialist, with the National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For mid-December, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.
You can’t help but have noticed our unusual weather for December.  This is shaping up to be our warmest on record, following the warmest fall on record.  The rain and temperatures seem more like Seattle than northern Minnesota.  There is no doubt that climate change is happening, and the Forest Service has nationally acknowledged it as one of the main challenges facing forests in the future.  While it is a challenge, forests are also one of our best weapons in the fight against greenhouse gases.  A lot of carbon dioxide is taken out of the air every year as trees photosynthesize, and that carbon is made into plant tissue and leaves.  Forests act as huge carbon sinks, so the Superior is doing its part to help reduce carbon dioxide.
On a more local scale, that warm weather, rain, and slushy snow has created some truly terrible driving conditions.  In the warm periods, gravel roads have been soft and slippery.  In the cold periods, they have been ice covered and slippery.  Either way, driving this year on Forest roads requires slowing down, and paying attention.  If you’ve got a four wheel drive vehicle, remember that four wheel drive does not equal eight wheel brakes, and while you might be able to get moving fast, you won’t slow down any better than other cars.
As unplowed back roads become snow covered, their use shifts to snowmobiles.  This time of year can see both snowmobiles and cars trying to use the same roadway, so both users need to watch out for each other.  Also in the mix are logging trucks.  Portions of Old Greenwood Road, Greenwood Road, and Firebox Road on the Gunflint District are snowmobile trails, but log hauling will be taking place on segments of these trails as well.  A good rule of thumb in the winter is that if a back road is plowed, chances are good it is being used for timber hauling.
Elsewhere on the Gunflint, log hauling is taking place on FR144 (Old Greenwood), Shoe Lake Road, Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, Bally Creek Road, Caribou Trail, Ball Club Road, and the Grade.  On the Tofte District, people can expect logging traffic on FR 369 and FR 380 from Sawbill Landing to Isabella; on FR 348 and FR 170 from the Whitefish Lake area to Lake County 7; and on FR 1238 and FR 170 from the Plouff Creek area to the Ball Club Road. 
To find out conditions on snowmobile trails, and ski trails as well, visit the Superior’s webpage.  There are links there to our cooperators who groom ski trails, and to the DNR site which has state park ski trail and grant in aid snowmobile trail conditions.  The DNR site also has a map of statewide snow depth.  Our site serves as a one-stop-shop to access all these different reporters of trail conditions.
Speaking of shopping, check out our District offices for nature-related books and other items which make great last minute gifts.  Doesn’t every house in the north woods need a stuffed Smokey the Bear?  You can also still pick up permits for Christmas trees and other holiday greenery if you’ve really been procrastinating. 
Have a great weekend, and until next time, this has been Steve Robertsen with the Superior National Forest Update. 
 

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Superior National Forest Update: December 4

Hi.  I’m Steve Robertsen, education specialist, with the National Forest Update  -  information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the Tofte and Gunflint Districts of the Forest. For early December, here’s what’s going on in the Forest.
While we haven’t yet gotten a lot of snow on the shore, you don’t need to go too far inland before things get a lot more December-ish.  We aren’t really up to conditions that will have our ski and snowmobile trails open, but hopefully nature will cooperate in the coming weeks and send us some more of the white stuff.  We really need a base of about six inches before grooming can start on most trails, and so far we don’t have that up here.
The lack of snow does make harvesting a Christmas tree and other holiday greenery easier this year, if a bit less scenic.  Christmas tree permits are for sale at both the Gunflint and Tofte offices.  Make sure to pick up the flyer with descriptions of where and how to cut trees.  The most important thing is to be sure you are on National Forest property before you cut anything.
This year, there is a national program called ‘Every Kid In A Park’.  Part of the program is a website, everykidinapark.gov, where fourth grade students can register to get a free pass that will give them free admittance to all the national parks and forests across the country.  After registering online, and doing some activities to earn the pass, they will be able to print off a voucher that can be exchanged for an official card at our district offices, or at Grand Portage National Monument.  Our local national parks and monuments don’t actually charge entrance fees, but if your family is planning to travel out west, your fourth graders pass will get the whole family in free to Yellowstone, or the Grand Canyon.  On the Superior, the pass will get you a free Christmas tree permit.  It might be a great year to start, or continue, a family tradition of heading out into the woods for a tree.
While driving into the woods, you’ll encounter some logging trucks that are harvesting a bit more than Christmas trees.  On the Tofte District, log trucks are hauling on FR 369 (Sawbill Landing or Trappers Lake Road) and FR 380, from Sawbill Landing to Isabella; on FR 348 (Whitefish Lake Road) and FR 170 (Fourmile Grade) from the Whitefish Lake area to Lake County 7; and on FR 1238 to Cook County 2 (Sawbill Trail) near Plouff Creek.   On the Gunflint District, log hauling is taking place on FR144 (Old Greenwood), Shoe Lake Road, Greenwood Road, Firebox Road, South Brule River Road, and Lima Grade.  Our timber people on both districts included a warning about the road conditions, which due to rain and freezing temperatures are slick and icy.  Reduce your speeds, allow for increased stopping distance, and remember that a loaded truck will have even a harder time stopping than you on ice.  Give them plenty of space.
Nationally, the Forest Service is conducting visitor use surveys to help understand how the public is using our forests.  Locally, that means that you may encounter signs along the road reading “Survey Ahead”, and then be asked if you want to help us by filling out a quick survey.  We hope you can take the time to help us out by taking the survey so we can better serve the public. 
We hope you can make a visit to the forest part of your holiday plans this season.  Nothing says holidays like the smell of balsam fir and a drive through snow covered evergreens with a CD of holiday tunes in the radio.
 
Have a great weekend, and until next time, this has been Steve Robertsen with the Superior National Forest Update. 
 

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