Listen Now
Pledge Now


 
 

North Shore Digest

North Shore Digest airs on WTIP Monday-Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. (hankoss/Flickr)

  • Monday 5-6pm
  • Tuesday 5-6pm
  • Wednesday 5-6pm
  • Thursday 5-6pm
Genre: 
News & Information
North Shore Digest airs from 5-6 p.m. weekdays and is the place to get caught up with what’s happening in your backyard and beyond, with international and national news from the Associated Press and local news from WTIP's News Department. The program always incorporates local announcements and events, significant interviews with local people and newsmakers, a mix of music, and features like National Native News, School News, and the Minnesota News Connection. 

What's On:

Sunny's Back Yard: Taking a walk

Sunny has lived off-grid in rural Lake County for the past 18 years and is a regular commentator on WTIP. Here she shares the benefits of taking a walk - especially in a natural setting - in Sunny's Back Yard.

Listen: 

 
Loon with fish, courtesy of Chik-Wauk

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 8

We’re a full week into month seven and the upper Trail weather is much less frightful than the previous two weekend segments. In fact, our National Birthday holiday was splendid for both Gunflint residents and visitors.

Rapidly as the days tick away it seems unnerving we are closing down July’s second weekend so soon. I’ve even heard comment to the effect that summer is over after Independence Day. This is a bit of a stretch, but then again we are only a three short weeks away from August as this scoop hits the air.

This in mind, the calendar for area folks is plenty full of summer activities. First up and highly important is the current membership drive for WTIP. At broadcast time, the station is into the third full day of its drive for membership support, with only two and one-half days remaining (until noon Monday).

WTIP needs you! Please get on board without delay. Give operators a call at (218) 387-1070 or 1(800) 473-9847, or click and join at WTIP.org – or better yet – stop by 1712 West Highway 61, hand deliver your pledge and see our staff and volunteers in person.

Next up is the fortieth year for the Gunflint Trail Canoe Races, scheduled for Wednesday, July 20, with food service beginning at 4:30 pm and races at 6:00. Plan to be there for all the fun on the waterfront at Gunflint Lodge.

Remember proceeds from this great community event go to support our Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department and EMS crew. Tickets for the general prize raffle and the kayak drawing are on sale now at Trail Center and any number of places along the Trail. They can also be bought on site the evening of the event.

As we get into August, the mid-Trail gang will be following up with their annual flea market, gift boutique and auction, also on behalf of our Gunflint protectors. Stay tuned to WTIP for more details on the August 10 happening which runs from 1:00 to 4:00 pm.

Like windrowed snow in winter, daisies are drifting in along our byway Trail sides. Thus they join our 60 mile “Technicolor” wildflower garden. It’s uncanny how “Mother Nature” has sequenced blooming things out this way. The floral show is just a mosaic of pigments.

A note on the loon chicks at the Chik-Wauk site, finds all is going well. They hatched on June 28-29. However, the big wind/rain storm of last weekend disturbed the parents enough causing them to move from the nesting platform to the bay southwest of the Museum. This new location, along the Moccasin Lane hiking trail, is actually more accessible for photo-ops than the birthing place.

A couple big Bull Moose sightings, in different locales on the Trail, have been reported. Being several miles apart, I presume they are two different characters, and this is heartening.

Further moose lore comes from a couple gals over on Leo Lake. I’m told they are seeing more moose this summer than in several years past. It was also shared that the ladies are in a challenge contest over who observes the most. To date one has seen 15 while the other has counted seven. It makes me wonder if they are counting the same critters time after time. Too bad the animals couldn’t be marked with a dab of paint for confirming ID’s. In any event, to see just one is great, and these ladies’ scorecards are fantastic. Maybe their sightings indicate a turn-around in the territory's moose population decline.

On a final note, a friend reports the observance of three young Pileated woodpeckers. I’m told the trio was found hanging out on the USFS leased land properties at the west end of Gunflint Lake. Guess the “woody woodpecker” look-alikes were making a lot of racket, perhaps calling for mom and pop who were nowhere to be seen and probably tired of the adolescent chatter.

This is Fred Smith, on the Trail at Wildersmith, encouraging your call to arms for WTIP!

Listen: 

 
Dr. Tiffany Wolf and Dr. Seth Moore

Dr. Seth Moore: Partnership with University of Minnesota looks at Grand Portage ecosystem health

Dr. Seth Moore is Director of Biology and Environment with the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa. 

The Grand Portage Reservation is located in the extreme northeast corner of Minnesota, on the North Shore of Lake Superior in Cook County. Bordered on the north by Canada, on the south and east by Lake Superior and on the west by Grand Portage State Forest, the reservation encompasses an historic fur trade site on scenic Grand Portage Bay.

The band engages in fisheries and wildlife research projects throughout the year, working with moose, wolves, fish, deer, grouse, and environmental issues. Dr. Moore appears regularly on WTIP North Shore Community Radio, talking about the band's current and ongoing natural resource projects, as well as other environmental and health related issues. 

In this segment, Dr. Moore talks about a partnership with the University of Minnesota taking a closer look at the health of the Grand Portage area’s ecosystem.

Listen: 

 

Citizens' Climate Lobby addresses climate change

The Citizens' Climate Lobby is a nonpartisan group working to spread the idea that each one of us can help to address climate change. Regional coordinators Paul Thompson and Mindy Ahler joined Grand Marais group leader Rebecca Wiinanen to talk about their mission and philosophy.
 
The local Grand Marais Citizens Climate Lobby meets on the second Saturday of each month. More information is available by email at grandmarais@citizensclimatelobby.org.
 

Listen: 

 
Jill Doerfler

Anishinaabe Way: "Those Who Belong" with author Jill Doerfler

The book "Those Who Belong: Identity, Family, Blood, and Citizenship among the White Earth Anishinaabeg" by UMD Professor Jill Doerfler, recently won the 2015 Midwest Independent Publishing Association Award for History. In this segment, Professor Doerfler gives a brief history of blood quantum as it relates to membership in the MN Chippewa Tribe, and describes recent efforts by some White Earth tribal members to create constitutional reform on that reservation, including a change from the 1/4 blood quantum required by the MN Chippewa Tribe (MCT) to a system that honors family lineage as the basis for citizenship at White Earth.

(Photo courtesy of Jill Doerfler)
 

Listen: 

 

LSProject: Why do we love Lake Superior?

Lake Superior is a big part of the landscape in northeastern Minnesota…and it has special meaning for most visitors and residents. In this edition of WTIP’s ongoing series, The Lake Superior Project, producer Martha Marnocha heard from several people with their thoughts on this huge freshwater lake.

Listen: 

 

A Year in the Wilderness: June 27 - Snipe Lake side trips

Cook County adventurers Dave and Amy Freeman are spending a year in the wilderness. On a regular basis they’ll be sharing some of their experiences traveling the BWCAW.

(Photo courtesy of Dave and Amy's Facebook page)

Listen: 

 
Moose down

West End News: June 23

The annual Gala For The Grove was a smashing success again last week, bringing the West End Community together to raise a solid nest egg for the Birch Grove Community School. The generosity of the community is truly a wonder to behold, even if it does happen reliably year after year. Dozens and dozens of raffle and auction items were donated from businesses and individuals from Grand Portage to Silver Bay. The bidding was reckless and occasionally hilarious, with some people bidding against their spouses or even themselves.

It's all for a good cause though, as Birch Grove Community School is the heartbeat of the West End. If we can't support our children, then what good are we?

In the midst of the auction, Charles VanDoren, from Schroeder, offered an interesting auction item. He had four tickets to an alumni football game on July 2nd at Cook County High School in Grand Marais. I think this means that the former Cook County football players will suit up and play against the current football team. While this makes me profoundly grateful that I am not eligible to play, it does mean that Charley VanDoren has agreed to play. He will be the oldest player on the field, representing the alumni as a current three-time and soon to be five-time grandfather. I wish him the most sincere luck and best wishes for not getting hurt. The proceeds from the fun will go to support the girl's basketball and volleyball teams, along with the boy's football team.

A few years ago, my girlfriend, Cindy Hansen, participated in the much less risky alumni cheerleading exhibition. While she did avoid any serious injury, I did notice that the Advil bottle was in active use for a couple of weeks afterward.

While it is great to see Birch Grove thriving, we will soon need to turn our attention to a couple of levy referendum questions that Cook County School District 166 will place on the ballot this November. While I disagree with the system of funding public schools through periodic referendum, I do recognize that it is how things are done now and we should wholeheartedly support the District 166 in their request. Most of our Birch Grove graduates end up attending 166 for their middle and high school years, so we need to keep the system strong for the sake of future generations and the future of Cook County - in my humble opinion.

The Lutsen 99er mountain bike race booked every room and many campsites in the West End for the weekend of June 25th. The race started with 80 riders five year ago and registered nearly 2,000 riders this year and that's with registrations being cut off at 1,800 - all this on a June weekend that didn't come close to selling out in the past. It's just one example of the growth in the tourism industry since the Visit Cook County organization was formed and funded. It's amazing what we can accomplish when we all work together.

The storm of Sunday, June 19, exacted a tragic toll in the BWCA Wilderness, with the death of a fine teacher from Rochester and the serious injury of his 14 year old son. The property damage from the storm, although substantial, paled in comparison to the loss and grief for the Walz family and their larger community in southeastern Minnesota. Our hearts go out to them.

In Lutsen, many trees went down, including a few that fell on renowned sculptor Tom Christianson's Last Chance Gallery. To add insult to the injury to Tom's roof, his larger than life, multi-colored steel moose sculpture was blown over. On the following Tuesday, Tom was surprised to see the moose spontaneously back on its feet. This bordered on a miracle, because the moose weighs a ton, so putting it upright was no small task. After an incredulous posting on Facebook, it came to light that the Good Samaritan was Mike MacMillan and his merry crew at MacMillan's Tree Service. They had been called to remove the trees from the gallery roof and while they were at it, they used their heavy equipment and considerable skills to upright the giant steel moose. It's not only a story of neighborliness, but also an apt metaphor for how the West End community takes care of each other in the practical matters of food and housing and also in attending to our artistic and culture needs. It's just a part of what makes the wonderful West End a great place to live.

For WTIP, this is Bill Hansen with the West End News.
 

Listen: 

 
Proposed mining projects near the BWCA Wilderness

West End News: June 16

 
Every West End resident feels pain in their heart when the word comes down that another person is missing and presumed drowned near the mouth of the Temperance River. We can only imagine the shock and horror of knowing that a loved one has gone from relaxing and recreating - to leaving this world - in the blink of an eye. Disbelief quickly turns to grief and the entire West End feels it. Our little community extends our deepest condolences to the family and friends of Alec Lawrenz, who they lost at the Temperance River last week.
 
It's been a tough week for the nation in light of the tragedy in Orlando. In my humble opinion, it's well past time that we enact common-sense gun safety laws that allow hunters and collectors to enjoy their hobby, while making it difficult for deranged shooters to get their hands on military grade weapons that are expressly manufactured to kill a lot of people fast. Believe me, I know this is a politically sensitive subject, but other countries have done it and we can do it, too.
 
On a cheerier note, after several years of anticipation, North Shore Winery and Sawtooth Mountain Cider House are opening for business on the Ski Hill Road in Lutsen. Owners Chuck Corliss and Kim Schroeder have hired Rob Grubb, from Tofte, to manage the new business. The grand opening is scheduled for Saturday, July 16th from 2 until 5 pm. I admit to being pretty ignorant about wine, so I look forward to learning more from the experts at North Shore Winery. 
 
It cheers my heart to see another new and entrepreneurial business starting up in the West End. Starting a business from scratch is a labor of love and an incredible amount of work, so I urge everyone to patronize the new businesses early and often. I'm also pleased to hear that the Winery and Cider House will be a new venue for acoustic music in the West End, adding to the already rich music scene that we all enjoy.
 
I mentioned the new FIKA Coffee location in Lutsen last week. I saw that the sign went up this week, so I'm guessing that the soft opening is underway. Stop by and check it out.
 
Speaking of jobs, the creation of jobs is the most talked about reason for opening up a new form of mining in northeastern Minnesota that extracts precious and strategic metals from sulfide bearing ore. No one wants economic development in northeastern Minnesota more than I do, but I am part of the majority of people in the region who are deeply skeptical about the motives and reliability of the companies that are behind these mining proposals. In a nutshell, mining from sulfide bearing ore has been done all over the world and has, in every single case, caused serious pollution flowing downstream from the mine waste.
 
The second mine in the permitting queue, known as the Twin Metals project, was dealt a serious blow this week when the Forest Service indicated that they have serious reservations about locating a huge sulfide type mine directly upstream from the BWCA Wilderness. The issue is complicated, but the Forest Service is the landowner of the surface rights above two federal mining leases that Twin Metals obtained back in the 1960s. Twin Metals let the leases expire, but now wants to renew them with no environmental review. The leases have never been reviewed because they were leased before all the pertinent environmental protection laws even existed.
 
In the past, mining leases were renewed more or less automatically with no public process. But this time, the Forest Service has announced a public input period from June 20th to July 20th for people to weigh in, both pro and con, about the wisdom of promoting sulfide mining right on the edge of the country's premier, water-based wilderness area. I applaud the Forest Service for getting the public involved. Opinion on this subject is changing fast and the decision makers need to know what people are thinking. These are, after all, our minerals.
 
I freely admit that my mind is firmly made up that this type of mining has no place in the region, but I urge everyone, no matter what your opinion, to let the Forest Service know how you feel about this important issue. You can google "Twin Metals public input" to find news stories with links to the comment process. Or, as always, contact WTIP for that information.
 
Fishing was excellent all over the West End last week. But after a big rain storm and the appearance of mayflies, it seems to have slowed down a little bit, especially for the walleyes. Walleyes are still being caught at dawn and dusk, but smallmouth and northerns are still being caught during the day. Lake trout are also biting well, but are now 30 feet deep or maybe even a little deeper.
 
You know that you may be a blueberry fanatic when you scout the berry patches at this time of year to see how the blossoms are coming along. I've come across several sets of locals, who wish to remain anonymous, that have been doing just that. They report that the blossoms are as thick and healthy as they've ever seen them, which bodes well for a bumper crop. A little warmth and sunshine will be required to make it happen and would be generally welcomed by most West Enders just for the fun of it. Rain or shine, it's still great to live, work in play in the wonderful West End.
 

Listen: 

 

A Year in the Wilderness: June 15 - Lake trout

Cook County adventurers Dave and Amy Freeman are spending a year in the wilderness. On a regular basis they’ll be sharing some of their experiences traveling the BWCAW.

(Photo courtesy of Dave and Amy's Facebook page)

Listen: