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North Shore Digest

North Shore Digest airs on WTIP Monday-Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. (hankoss/Flickr)

  • Monday 5-6pm
  • Tuesday 5-6pm
  • Wednesday 5-6pm
  • Thursday 5-6pm
Genre: 
News & Information
North Shore Digest airs from 5-6 p.m. weekdays and is the place to get caught up with what’s happening in your backyard and beyond, with international and national news from the Associated Press and local news from WTIP's News Department. The program always incorporates local announcements and events, significant interviews with local people and newsmakers, a mix of music, and features like National Native News, School News, and the Minnesota News Connection. 

What's On:
Birch Grove Community School

School News from Birch Grove: November 17

Sophia and Kalina report the latest School News.

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Great Expectations Charter School

School News from Great Expectations: November 12

Bryn and Grace report the latest School News.

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Planting and harvesting native sweet grass - the sacred hair of Mother Earth

Throughout this school year, the Cook County Invasives Team will be working with Ms. Nikki’s second and third grade class at Oshki Ogimaag Community School on a project to learn about the importance of native species in our natural environment. Invasives Team Coordinator Laurel Wilson describes the Sweet Grass project in this feature.

For more information on this, and other Cook County Invasives Team projects visit arrowheadinvasives.org.

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North Woods Naturalist: Ciscoes

There are many names for lake herring, but only one that’s truly correct. WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with naturalist Chel Anderson about ciscos.

(NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory)

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Planning and preparing for winter safety

Late fall has been mild so far, but winter weather isn’t far off. WTIP’s Jay Andersen spoke with Mike Keyport about winter preparedness.

(Photo by Martha Marnocha)

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Chairwoman Diver

Anishinaabe Way: The Inherent Right of Sovereignty, Part 3

Karen Diver has been the Tribal Chair of the Fond du Lac Reservation since 2007. She was recently named Special Assistant to the President for Native American Affairs. She will be the first elected tribal leader to hold such a high level position at the White House. In this interview, she discusses the role that gaming plays in economic development and tribal self-determination. She also shares what accomplishments she is most proud of.

(Photo courtesy of Karen Diver)
 

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Gathering water along the Basswood River

A Year in the Wilderness: October 29 - Traveling the Horse and Basswood Rivers

Cook County adventurers Dave and Amy Freeman are spending a year in the wilderness. On a regular basis they’ll be sharing some of their experiences travelling the BWCAW. Here’s their latest installment as they travel the Horse and Basswood Rivers.

 

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Pacific loon

North Woods Naturalist: Fall Migration

The bird migration at Hawk Ridge is approaching half a million. WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with naturalist Chel Anderson about songbirds and raptors, ducks and loons.

(Photo courtesy of Morro Bay Winter Loon Study on Flickr)

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Stage Door: Auditions

‘Stage Door’ takes us behind the scenes at the Grand Marais Playhouse. It’s a chance to meet the artists involved in our local theater…in addition to the people involved in production at the Playhouse.
 
Stage door is produced by Tina Krauz for the Grand Marais Playhouse and WTIP. 

The Grand Marais Playhouse production of ‘As You Like It’ opens Thursday, November 12, and will run for two weekends at the Arrowhead Center for the Arts. 

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Sonny Meyers

Anishinaabe Way: The Inherent Right of Sovereignty, Part 2

Article 11 of the Treaty of 1854 provides for the retained rights to hunting, fishing and gathering of resources in lands ceded by Anishinaabe tribes in 1854.

Sonny Meyers, the Director of the 1854 Treaty Authority, and Grand Portage Tribal Chair Norman Deschampe, explain the meaning of ceded territory in exchange for retained rights and how tribal resource management differs from the State of Minnesota's approach to resource management.

Director Meyers also stresses the importance of educating the public and local officials about treaty rights and reflects on public perceptions about the "tribal take" versus the "tribal give."
 

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