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North Shore Weekend

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  • Saturday 7-10am
Genre: 
Variety
Host CJ Heithoff brings you this Saturday morning show, created at the request of WTIP listeners.  North Shore Weekend features three hours of community information, features, interviews, and music. It's truly a great way to start your weekend on the North Shore. Arts, cultural and history features on WTIP’s North Shore Weekend are made possible with funding from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

 

 


What's On:

Albert Bally's WWI Letters Home

Albert Bally - Letter Home WWI  #15

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Moose - Barbara Friedman via Flickr

Wildersmith on the Gunflint November 3, 2017

WTIP News November 3, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint      by     Fred Smith

The usual warning of November hit a few days early this year. The curtain call of autumn came abruptly last week with our first winter storm. Although it was not as bad here as other places in the northland, the four to six inches in the upper Trail was a good start to the new season. However, there is a qualifier to this report; the earth is still warm and much could be melted from the ground up by broadcast time, we’ll see!      

The first snow of the season always creates a great deal of excitement for everyone in border country, regardless of the annoyance or hardship it may cause. Most who live above forty-eight or forty-nine degrees north can hardly wait for the first episode of natural tree decorating.                                                                                                                                                                

The late October dropping in this neighborhood did not disappoint as the wet sticky white clung to everything pointing skyward. Every year I swear the first coating is the most beautiful ever, and this year is no exception. For those trying to capture digital winter splendor, this was the place to be. The magic of snow covered pine was especially glorious along the Mile O Pine as I begin keying this weeks’ Gunflint scoop.                                                                                                                   
The recent winter-like happening didn’t come close to the record Halloween season storm of twenty-six years ago. In all likelihood, most 2017 ghosts did their trick or treat thing, like snowshoe hares, blending inconspicuously with our pale landscape.                                                                                                          

With our eleventh month only hours old, the full “freezing over moon” will be beaming down on the northland this weekend. Incidentally, as the monthly lunar experience graces our frosty forest, the reality of standard time makes its’ semi-annual return. Don’t forget to “fall back” as you retire on Saturday evening, or you’ll be out-of-step with the rest of humanity next morning.                                                                                                                                                                 
Another feature of the first snow allows us residents to see who of the “wild neighborhood” has been prowling around during darkness hours. Tracks in the fluff revealed a pine marten stopped by the Wildersmith place, likely looking for a hand-out of the usual poultry parts.

Meanwhile, a neighbor down the road had a visit from a fisher (a marten on steroids) while another left foot print evidence of being here too.  Tracks in the snow never cease to stir up adventurous thoughts about success in the realm of predator pursuit and prey survival.                                   

A day or so prior to the siege of ice and snow, during an evening drive along the Trail, the Smith’s came upon two moose blocking our path. We hadn’t seen one in some time, so as usual, this was a treat.                                                                                                                                          
Both were cows, not hanging out together, but separated by a couple miles. Fortunately, their silhouettes against the setting sun back drop were observed early enough to avoid a collision, and neither chose to be stubborn about getting off the road, so “no harm, no foul” to either moose or vehicle.                                                                                                                                                  

Other animal tidings would find it reasonable to assume, bears have retired to dens, while whitetail deer hunting season commences this weekend. Safe and happy hunting to all! For the next couple weeks, those in outdoor activities should be dressed in warning gear and on the look-out for those folks in blaze orange or hot pink sitting out in the woods trying to act like a bush.                                                                                                                                                

Listener/readers will remember my commentary a few weeks back about a bear pilfering my greasy bar-b-que gloves. I was surprised just days ago when an anonymous reader or readers in Iowa took pity on me, and shipped a replacement pair. What a neat, but unsolicited gesture! Thank you so much, Mr. &/or Mrs. whoever you are!                                                                                                         

It’s with sadness I announce that word has been received on the death of another Gunflint Trail neighbor. Jean Foster, of West Des Moines, Iowa and a longtime summer home resident on the west end of Gunflint Lake passed away on October 25, in Des Moines. Gunflint Community condolences are extended to her husband, Robert, three daughters and a granddaughter.                                                                                                                                               
A final note comes for all WTIP users. At this time next week the WTIP family will be in the middle of its fall/winter membership drive. The excitement begins on Thursday, November 9 and runs for five days, ending at noon on the 13th.                                                                                                    

As with every fund drive, member participation is critical to ensure continued growth of WTIP, the BEST in community radio. If you are a current family member, we need you to re-invest. If you have never joined, but enjoy what this broadcast Phenom has to offer, you’re invited to “Join Together” with the extended WTIP family from around the globe.                                                                                                              

It’s easy to do and your support is so appreciated. Phone in a pledge, do so on-line, or even better, stop by the studios. For more details, go to the web site, WTIP.org.                                                                                                             
For WTIP, this is Wildersmith, on the Trail, where every day is great, especially when “Biboon” (winter) gets rolling!
 
 

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LeaflessTrees.jpg

Wildersmith on the Gunflint October 27

WTIP News     October 27, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith
October splendor has been shining down on the Gunflint territory over the past seven days. Temperatures have been bouncing around between cold and moderately warm for this time of year. Our only glitch in the atmosphere comes in regard to being left on the dry side of the moisture ledger for more than two weeks along the Mile O Pine. 

 With less than two tenths here at Wildersmith during this time, it makes one a little nervous concerning fire danger since protection systems have been put to bed for the coming winter. 
                                                                             
Since we last met on WTIP, the upper Gunflint landscape has edged ever closer to winter. Few leaves are left hanging while Tamarack needles have had their day of glory, and are tarnished into the dusting off stage.                                                                                                                             
I’m always amazed at the seemingly un-countable shades of brown summoned by “Mother Nature” as summer dries up through the autumn season. With hues from buff to coffee bean brown, we’ve got them all, along this magnificent scenic by-way.                                                             
So the Gunflint color show continues with now toasted embellishments, still beautiful in such a distinct way. It’s surely worth another trek out this way, to soak it all in, before the next act takes our border country stage.                                                                                                                                                             
These times in the wildland are exclusively unique. Quiet rules supreme as summer/fall hubbub has almost ground to a halt. There are few snippets of hullabaloo pollution disturbing the tranquility of nature doing its thing. Sounds of late October are minimal except for those of natural creation.  
                                                                                                                                              
Winds in the pines whisper sweet nothings of warm day remembrances, while waiting to turn on a warning roar from the great “spirit of the north.” Added accompaniment comes from white caps dashing the granite shores. All the while, those in our ‘wild neighborhood’ chirp, chatter, squawk and snipe at each other, as they go about their daily survival routines. 
                                                                                                                                 
We who stay to endure the cold and white can peacefully reflect on these cherished wilderness blessings right outside our back doors. It’s a time when cool evenings deliver the romantic aroma of smoke from a wood burning stove, favoring thoughts of a warm cozy doze in the recliner. It’s a time when tree sap starts thickening down to the roots. It’s a time when snowshoe hares pull up their white socks to belly wader heights while other fur bearers are changing to heavy duty camo apparel and some burrow in to cold season quarters.  It’s a time to relish! 
                                                                                                                                                               
Although winter-like conditions are only in the long range planning stages, I’ve noticed the cold season “welcome wagon” out along trail sides over the last few days. Those neighborly snow buntings seem to be getting an early start on gathering seed fare from roadside shoulders, and are erupting with skyward flare at the approach of an on-coming vehicle. To see the perky little avian confirms a sign of things to come. 
                                                                                               
In the meantime, on recent days when the sun shines warm, hordes of obnoxious summer time bugs have been re-invigorated. Black flies, mosquitos and pesky gnat like critters are re-enforcing cries from us humans for cold and to stay cold! I’ve even seen a few folks outdoors doing pre-winter chores wearing their bug nets. Buggy conditions like we’ve been enduring of late are usually un-heard of as trick or treat night nears. 
                                                                                  
Speaking of Halloween night in the offing, the first quarter of the “freezing over” Ojibwe moon, is on high right now.  We could do well to have a little of its “cold spirit” to send the swarming nasties a packing.                                                                                                                                                           
Until this happens, Gunflinters can think back to the blizzard of flakes that stopped ghosts and goblins activity deep in its tracks in 1991. There were no bugs then, but up to forty plus inches of snow. Those were truly, the “good old days.”  
                                                                                                   
For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith, where every day is great, regardless of what might be causing those bites and itches!
 

Listen: 

 

Wildersmith on the Gunflint October 27

WTIP News     October 27, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith
October splendor has been shining down on the Gunflint territory over the past seven days. Temperatures have been bouncing around between cold and moderately warm for this time of year. Our only glitch in the atmosphere comes in regard to being left on the dry side of the moisture ledger for more than two weeks along the Mile O Pine. 

 With less than two tenths here at Wildersmith during this time, it makes one a little nervous concerning fire danger since protection systems have been put to bed for the coming winter. 
                                                                             
Since we last met on WTIP, the upper Gunflint landscape has edged ever closer to winter. Few leaves are left hanging while Tamarack needles have had their day of glory, and are tarnished into the dusting off stage.                                                                                                                             
I’m always amazed at the seemingly un-countable shades of brown summoned by “Mother Nature” as summer dries up through the autumn season. With hues from buff to coffee bean brown, we’ve got them all, along this magnificent scenic by-way.                                                             
So the Gunflint color show continues with now toasted embellishments, still beautiful in such a distinct way. It’s surely worth another trek out this way, to soak it all in, before the next act takes our border country stage.                                                                                                                                                             
These times in the wildland are exclusively unique. Quiet rules supreme as summer/fall hubbub has almost ground to a halt. There are few snippets of hullabaloo pollution disturbing the tranquility of nature doing its thing. Sounds of late October are minimal except for those of natural creation.  
                                                                                                                                              
Winds in the pines whisper sweet nothings of warm day remembrances, while waiting to turn on a warning roar from the great “spirit of the north.” Added accompaniment comes from white caps dashing the granite shores. All the while, those in our ‘wild neighborhood’ chirp, chatter, squawk and snipe at each other, as they go about their daily survival routines. 
                                                                                                                                 
We who stay to endure the cold and white can peacefully reflect on these cherished wilderness blessings right outside our back doors. It’s a time when cool evenings deliver the romantic aroma of smoke from a wood burning stove, favoring thoughts of a warm cozy doze in the recliner. It’s a time when tree sap starts thickening down to the roots. It’s a time when snowshoe hares pull up their white socks to belly wader heights while other fur bearers are changing to heavy duty camo apparel and some burrow in to cold season quarters.  It’s a time to relish! 
                                                                                                                                                               
Although winter-like conditions are only in the long range planning stages, I’ve noticed the cold season “welcome wagon” out along trail sides over the last few days. Those neighborly snow buntings seem to be getting an early start on gathering seed fare from roadside shoulders, and are erupting with skyward flare at the approach of an on-coming vehicle. To see the perky little avian confirms a sign of things to come. 
                                                                                               
In the meantime, on recent days when the sun shines warm, hordes of obnoxious summer time bugs have been re-invigorated. Black flies, mosquitos and pesky gnat like critters are re-enforcing cries from us humans for cold and to stay cold! I’ve even seen a few folks outdoors doing pre-winter chores wearing their bug nets. Buggy conditions like we’ve been enduring of late are usually un-heard of as trick or treat night nears. 
                                                                                  
Speaking of Halloween night in the offing, the first quarter of the “freezing over” Ojibwe moon, is on high right now.  We could do well to have a little of its “cold spirit” to send the swarming nasties a packing.                                                                                                                                                           
Until this happens, Gunflinters can think back to the blizzard of flakes that stopped ghosts and goblins activity deep in its tracks in 1991. There were no bugs then, but up to forty plus inches of snow. Those were truly, the “good old days.”  
                                                                                                   
For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith, where every day is great, regardless of what might be causing those bites and itches!
 

Listen: 

 
LeaflessTrees.jpg

Wildersmith on the Gunflint October 27

WTIP News     October 27, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith
October splendor has been shining down on the Gunflint territory over the past seven days. Temperatures have been bouncing around between cold and moderately warm for this time of year. Our only glitch in the atmosphere comes in regard to being left on the dry side of the moisture ledger for more than two weeks along the Mile O Pine. 

 With less than two tenths here at Wildersmith during this time, it makes one a little nervous concerning fire danger since protection systems have been put to bed for the coming winter. 
                                                                             
Since we last met on WTIP, the upper Gunflint landscape has edged ever closer to winter. Few leaves are left hanging while Tamarack needles have had their day of glory, and are tarnished into the dusting off stage.                                                                                                                             
I’m always amazed at the seemingly un-countable shades of brown summoned by “Mother Nature” as summer dries up through the autumn season. With hues from buff to coffee bean brown, we’ve got them all, along this magnificent scenic by-way.                                                             
So the Gunflint color show continues with now toasted embellishments, still beautiful in such a distinct way. It’s surely worth another trek out this way, to soak it all in, before the next act takes our border country stage.                                                                                                                                                             
These times in the wildland are exclusively unique. Quiet rules supreme as summer/fall hubbub has almost ground to a halt. There are few snippets of hullabaloo pollution disturbing the tranquility of nature doing its thing. Sounds of late October are minimal except for those of natural creation.  
                                                                                                                                              
Winds in the pines whisper sweet nothings of warm day remembrances, while waiting to turn on a warning roar from the great “spirit of the north.” Added accompaniment comes from white caps dashing the granite shores. All the while, those in our ‘wild neighborhood’ chirp, chatter, squawk and snipe at each other, as they go about their daily survival routines. 
                                                                                                                                 
We who stay to endure the cold and white can peacefully reflect on these cherished wilderness blessings right outside our back doors. It’s a time when cool evenings deliver the romantic aroma of smoke from a wood burning stove, favoring thoughts of a warm cozy doze in the recliner. It’s a time when tree sap starts thickening down to the roots. It’s a time when snowshoe hares pull up their white socks to belly wader heights while other fur bearers are changing to heavy duty camo apparel and some burrow in to cold season quarters.  It’s a time to relish! 
                                                                                                                                                               
Although winter-like conditions are only in the long range planning stages, I’ve noticed the cold season “welcome wagon” out along trail sides over the last few days. Those neighborly snow buntings seem to be getting an early start on gathering seed fare from roadside shoulders, and are erupting with skyward flare at the approach of an on-coming vehicle. To see the perky little avian confirms a sign of things to come. 
                                                                                               
In the meantime, on recent days when the sun shines warm, hordes of obnoxious summer time bugs have been re-invigorated. Black flies, mosquitos and pesky gnat like critters are re-enforcing cries from us humans for cold and to stay cold! I’ve even seen a few folks outdoors doing pre-winter chores wearing their bug nets. Buggy conditions like we’ve been enduring of late are usually un-heard of as trick or treat night nears. 
                                                                                  
Speaking of Halloween night in the offing, the first quarter of the “freezing over” Ojibwe moon, is on high right now.  We could do well to have a little of its “cold spirit” to send the swarming nasties a packing.                                                                                                                                                           
Until this happens, Gunflinters can think back to the blizzard of flakes that stopped ghosts and goblins activity deep in its tracks in 1991. There were no bugs then, but up to forty plus inches of snow. Those were truly, the “good old days.”  
                                                                                                   
For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith, where every day is great, regardless of what might be causing those bites and itches!
 

Listen: 

 

Superior National Forest Update October 27

Superior National Forest Update – October 26, 2017.

Hi.  I’m Haley Henderson, crewleader with the Civilian Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. The Conservation Corps is a group which partners with the Forest Service to bring young adults to work on projects such as clearing trails throughout the summer.  We’ve been very busy this summer and have enjoyed our time on the Superior.  To help you enjoy your time in the woods, here’s what’s happening for the week of October 27th.

Sometimes fall ends slowly and almost invisibly.  This year, it fell with a thud.  Last week’s high winds, equivalent to a tropical storm, blew most of the remaining leaves off in a single day, and now there is snow.  This is actually a fairly late snowfall, we usually have snow show up sometime during October before now. 

It is good time of year to realize that weather does in fact change very quickly at times.  What seems like the proper clothing at the beginning of a hunting or hiking trip can suddenly become far too thin and cold later in the day.  Always check the weather forecast before you go out, and be prepared for the worst case scenario.  With overpacking, the worst that can happen is that you get extra exercise carrying along your stocking hat and mittens, but with underpacking the worst that can happen is hypothermia and even death.

A lot of people are out using ATVs right now.  Road use rules are available in the form of paper maps at our offices.  These maps are the final word on what is allowed on what roads.  If map designations appear to contradict signs on the ground, the map is correct.  We are happy to say that these maps are now available as georeferenced PDF files on our website.  They can be downloaded for use on a smart phone, even outside of cell service areas, and your location can be seen using available apps such as Avenza.  Remember though that all electronic navigation systems are subject to failure, and you should also pack along a paper map and bring a compass.
The high winds brought some branches down onto the roads.  Be aware that around any corner, you may discover a tree or log across the roadway.  If you decide to clear any debris from the road, make sure you have good visibility of any oncoming vehicles and you park your vehicle in a safe manner.  Don’t risk yourself just to move some branches.  Large blockages should be reported to the Forest Service if they are on Forest Service roads, or to the county on county roads.

Our cold weather and snow means that ice is showing up in some areas.  Just as you can be surprised by a deadfall just around the corner, you can be surprised by ice just over the hill.  Roads that are clear and warm in the sun can be icy in the shade of hills or trees.  Later in the season, we’ll all be used to icy roads, but this time of year ice can be completely unexpected. 

In addition to trees and ice, there may be trucks out on the roads.  Truck traffic is using the same roadways as last week.  Hauling on Gunflint is taking place on the following roads: Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, and Devil Track Road.   Tofte logging traffic will be on the Pancore Road, Sawbill Trail, Dumbbell River Road, Wanless Road, Lake County 7 and 705, the 4 Mile Grade, The Grade, Perent Lake Road, Trappers Lake Road, Temperance River Road, and the Six Hundred Road.  There will also be gravel hauling between Sawbill and Toohey Lake  where they will be taking gravel from the Dog Tired Pit off the Sawbill Trail to an area about 2 miles south of The Grade.

So, whether you are in a truck, car, or on your ATV, drive defensively and carefully this time of year.  Pack for the weather, fill your window washer tank in your car, and find your shovel and ice scraper.  Until next week, this has been Haley Henderson with the National Forest Update.
 

Listen: 

 
Bird Migration

North Woods Naturalist: High flying birds

On an average day birds fly around 500 or so feet high. During migration they climb a lot higher…a lot higher than we mammals could ever hope to survive.

WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about high flying birds.
 

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Leaves on the Ground

North Woods Naturalist: Autumn winding down

There are a number of indications that autumn is in full swing, maybe even turning the corner.

WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about autumn winding down.

Listen: 

 

Superior National Forest Update October 20

National Forest Update – October 19, 2017.
Hi.  I’m Sandee Nazhad, customer service representative, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior. Here’s what’s happening for the week of October 20th.

Despite our warm spell, the Forest continues to move onwards toward winter in many ways.  Leaves are past what most people might think of as peak, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t still beautiful out there.  In addition to the remaining yellow aspen and birch, the tamaracks are wonderfully golden right now, and the leaves on the ground add scent and sound to the fall forest. 

Hunters are one of the other signs of winter’s approach.  We are in the middle of both grouse season and archery season for deer.  Additionally, many deer hunters are scouting the woods in preparation for rifle season and may be starting to put up temporary deer stands and sight-in their guns.  It’s the time of year when you need to be sure to be wearing orange whether you are a hunter or not, and practicing safe firearms handling if you are carrying or using a weapon.  Of course, people aren’t the only things out in the woods.  We’ve had a couple of crews come across moose recently, sometimes a bit closer than expected.  Moose can be a bit crabby this time of year, and if you do happen on one in the brush, it’s not the season to be approaching closely.  Just back out slowly until you are at a safe distance before you start taking pictures.

Flour Lake Campground will still have water available from the nearby lodge for this weekend, but otherwise all the campgrounds have their water systems shut off and are in a ‘non-fee’ status.  You can still camp there, but you’ll have to bring your own water and haul out your garbage.  We also stop resupplying outhouses in the fall, so you may want to pack your own paper, just in case.  Docks are also being pulled from boat accesses, and will be out of most lakes by the end of this week.

Fire crews will be burning slash piles this month as conditions allow.  These piles are being monitored as they burn.  Our relatively wet summer has given us low fire danger most of the time, but there have been a couple of recent ‘red flag days’ just to the west of us.  With green leaves off the trees now, it doesn’t take but a few days of dry winds and low humidity to raise the fire danger.  If you are planning on burning this fall, make sure to get a proper permit, and also apply common sense to your local conditions.  Don’t burn if it just seems like a bad idea.

While I hate to see Christmas items at stores when Halloween hasn’t even happened, there is a little Christmas in the air as some people have started to harvest balsam boughs for wreaths already.  If you are doing this, check at a Forest Service office for required permits, and remember that you need to be at least 50 feet off any roadside, trail, lake shore, or recreation area when you are cutting.

There is truck traffic out there this week.  Much of it is in the same areas as the last few weeks.  Hauling on Gunflint is taking place on the following roads: Firebox Road, Blueberry Road, Greenwood Road, Shoe Lake Road, Forest Road 1385, the Gunflint Trail, South Brule Road, Lima Grade, Trestle Pine Road, Ball Club Road, and Devil Track Road.   Tofte logging traffic will be on the Pancore Road, Sawbill Trail, Dumbbell River Road, Wanless Road, Lake County 7 and 705, the 4 Mile Grade, The Grade, Perent Lake Road, Trappers Lake Road, Temperance River Road, and the Six Hundred Road.  There will also be gravel hauling between Sawbill and Toohey Lake  where they will be taking gravel from the Dog Tired Pit off the Sawbill Trail to an area about 2 miles south of The Grade.

Afternoon thundershowers are predicted for Saturday so make sure to do your vacuuming and cleaning then because Sunday and most of next week look great to be outside in the woods.  And who wants to vacuum on a nice day?  Until next week, this has been Sandee Nazhad with the National Forest Update.
 

Listen: 

 

Wildersmith on the Gunflint October 20

October 20, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint     by     Fred Smith
Our northern forest has pretty much shed its autumnal coat. The deciduous tree scene is largely gray, scraggily skeletons, lurking amongst their evergreen cousins. The last vestige of descending things will be laid to rest by this airing as Tamarack gold layers up on the landscape.

Fitting for the advance of ghost and goblin time, an eerie quiet hangs over the landscape during the time we mourn the death of summer leaves and the mosaic of falls’ last hurrah. With the growth of our wildland world taking its final bow, the long stillness of winter is waiting in anticipation as “Mother Nature will soon be issuing a first “winter watch.”

Several frosty mornings of late are setting the stage, and days of clouds hang cold and heavy over border country. It goes without saying these billows of heavenly drab might soon deliver moisture of frozen character. Anecdotally, I observed the first skim of ice on a bird water dish and on a Trailside pond last Tuesday morning.
                                                                                                                                                                                     Meanwhile, around the Wildersmith place, “getting ready” chores are about complete, so the “wizard of winter wonder” can bring it on. My last dip in the lake, to retrieve wildfire sprinkler hoses, found the liquid in the low fifties, a real attention grabber.                                                                                                                                                                                          
In the past few days, I’ve started placing a little daytime sustenance out on the deck side feed trough. Our first returnees, those “whiskey jacks” and blue jays, were joined last Monday by an infrequent visitor of ebony character. We seldom have ravens land here, although they are often rapping overhead. So getting to see one up real close was a treat. Guess some fatty meat scraps were more than this dapper corvine could resist, prompting the fast food stop-over.
                                                                                                                     
A couple reported a busy beaver along the Trail just days ago. This critter of former fur trade notoriety was engaged in laying up cold season vittles. “Bucky” was so engrossed in dragging a fresh aspen branch across the black-top it failed to look before crossing. The gnawing herbivore narrowly missed becoming a “road-kill’ statistic as the attentive driver braked just in time allowing this paddle tail varmint another chance on life.  
The incident happened in the area just above the observation pull-off at the Laurentian Divide where a roadside pond accommodates beaver lodging, and is also the home of Beaver & Beaver Construction. So if locals are driving through this area, be on the watch to give this guy/gal a break.                                                                                                                                                                                  
Speaking of another chance on life, a number of stately young red pines had theirs literally cut short. They were destroyed in a recent nature trail slashing occurrence along the Seagull River in the upper Gunflint region. Whether the episode was a case of vandalism or an ill-advised, un-supervised agency endeavor, it is tragically dis-heartening.

These were trees planted by volunteers following the Ham Lake fire during the Gunflint Green-up efforts of 2008, 9 and 10. Just getting their roots firmly established, after nearly ten years, many were eight to ten foot tall. Hopefully, those responsible can be found and held accountable for their actions.

 “Moose Madness” throughout the county this weekend holds hope for some candid Alces Alces appearances. Although the north land icons don’t take well to public appearances, this would be the right time that a few might step out of seclusion and show off a little bit of Trail legacy. Its’ Minnesota Education Association weekend and visitors by the hundreds will cruise the Byway, searching, in hope of catching a glimpse from “moose-dom.” Good luck and happy viewing to all!

By the way, while moose searching, it will be the last chance for a visit to the Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center up at Trails end. The historical facility will close its doors for the season at the end of the day Sunday. The Gunflint Trail Historical Society thanks the thousands of visitors for coming this season. 

Everyone is invited back, come next spring, as two new facilities will be taking shape around the campus. These additions will be first hand history in the making as the GTHS builds to share more of the Gunflint Trail story.

For WTIP, this is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith, where every day is great, no matter what the season!

 

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