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Northern Gardening

Northern Gardening

  • 2nd Thursday 7-8pm
  • and following Saturday at 6am
Genre: 
News & Information

Recipes | Local Food on the North Shore

Northern Gardening covers a variety of gardening topics relevant to our northern climate. The program airs on the second Thursday of each month from 7-8 p.m. and is rebroadcast the following Saturday at 6 a.m. The program is a partnership between the Northwoods Food Project, the Cook County U of MN Extension Office, and WTIP.

The Northwood's Food Project is a non-profit organization who's purpose is to increase Cook County's long term food sustainability and self-reliance by eating and growing locally produced food.
 

Learn more about the partnership between WTIP, the Northwoods Food Project, and the Cook County U of MN Extension Office that makes Northern Gardening possible.

Jeanne Wright and daughter Olya, Diane Booth, and Melinda Spinler in the WTIP studio for Northern Gardening.


What's On:
 

Recent recipes: basil pesto, garden veggie pesto pasta and chipotle brownies

Here are three recipes recently submitted by Northern Gardening fans.
Do you have a favorite using vegetables from your garden? Send to joan.farnam@gmail.com and we'll post it here.
P.S. The Chipotle Brownie recipe doesn't really qualify unless you're growing anaheim chilis and smoking them yourself, but I thought people might be interested to try it. They've gotten rave reviews.

Fresh Basil Pesto

Submitted by Ann Rosenquist, Grand Marais

Ingredients
2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan Reggiano or Romano cheese (leave out cheese if freezing)
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup pine nuts, walnuts or roasted, unsalted sunflower seeds
3 medium-sized garlic cloves, minced
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

A food processor makes this a lot easier.

Combine the basil with the nuts and pulse a few times in a food processer. Add the garlic, pulse a few times more.
Slowly add the olive oil in a constant stream while the food processor is on. Stop to scrape down the sides with a rubber spatula. Add the grated cheese and pulse again until blended. Add a pinch of salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste.
Makes 1 cup.
Serve with pasta or over baked potatoes, or spread over toasted baguette slices.
(Source: Simplyrecipes.com)

Garden Veggie Pesto Pasta
Submitted by Becky Stoner, Grand Marais 

 

Ingredients:
1 pound of your favorite pasta ( I use rotini so it holds more pesto)
olive oil
parmesan cheese
pine nuts
2 cups of your favorite garden vegetables, cut up small ( I like carrots, broccoli and cauliflower for color and texture)
1/2 to 1 c pesto to taste

Cook the pasta for 2 minutes less than the full time listed on the package.
Keep it in the pan and add the vegetables to the pasta and boiling water for that last 2 minutes and turn up the heat.
Drain pasta and vegetables. Do not rinse.
Return them to the pan and add pesto and some some olive oil to dilute the pesto a little. Stir to blend.
Add pine nuts and parmesan cheese in it or on top, to taste.
Vary the amounts based on what you like. Eat hot or cold.
For leftovers ( if there are any!) store well in fridge and reheat with a little water added.

Enjoy!

Cami's Chipolte Brownies

Submitted by Laurie Horn, Ely

 

These are best made a day ahead to let flavors meld, then serve with a good vanilla ice cream.

 

2 c. sugar

1 1/4 c flour

3/4 c. cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

3-4 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)  (I use 2-3)

1/8 teaspoon chipolte powder (optional) (I've used more but be careful)

3/4 c. veg. oil

4 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 c. choc. chips (optional)

 

Mix dry ingredients together.

Mix wet ingredients together.

Combine.

Add choc. chips if using.

 

Greased round pan or 8 X 8 square.  350 degrees preheated.

 


Program: 

 
rick at gp comm garden.JPEG

Grand Portage Community Garden & Recipes for the Food We Are Growing

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Richard Olson, a gardener in the Grand Portage Community Garden, above, and CSA gardener Ann Rosenquist join hosts Diane Booth and Joan Farnam to talk about the community garden in Grand Portage and recipes for our abundant garden produce this year.

Click on the audio file tab to hear the program, which was first aired Aug. 5.

Click here to see a video made about the Grand Portage Community Garden in mid-July.

The Recipes
OK, let's face it... zucchini can get pretty overwhelming by this time in August.
To help you out, here are a few recipes from listeners and fans with new ways to use up those (sometimes) too large, summer squashes;
There are also a few recipes for all those other wonderful things growing in your garden this summer.

Baked Zucchini Slices

Jana  Berka, Grand Marais

2 medium zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices

1/2 cup seasoned dry bread crumbs

1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

2 egg whites

Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F (245 degrees C).

In one small bowl, stir together the bread crumbs, pepper and Parmesan cheese. Place the egg whites in a separate bowl. Dip zucchini slices into the egg whites, then coat the breadcrumb mixture. Place on a greased baking sheet.

Bake for 5 minutes in the preheated oven, then turn over and bake for another 5 to 10 minutes, until browned and crispy.


Chocolate Zucchini Cake by Amy Sharpe

Joyce C. Yamamoto, Little Marais

3 large eggs

2 cups sugar

1 cup vegetable oil

1 tsp. vanilla

2 Tbsp. butter

6 Tbsp. cocoa powder

2 cups zucchini, grated

2 cups flour

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. salt

1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

2/3 cup chocolate chips

2 tsp. flour

1 cup chopped nuts (optional)

—Combine first 4 ingredients and blend well. Melt butter and add cocoa, cool.

Grate zucchini (I didn’t peel it). Add zucchini and cocoa to first mixture.

In a separate bowl, combine flour, soda, salt and cinnamon. Add dry  ingredients to batter and stir ‘til blended. Coat chips with 2 tsp. flour and add to  batter with nuts.

Spoon batter into 2 generously greased and floured 9x5x3 loaf pans or one  bundt pan. Bake 60-70 minutes at 350 degrees until a toothpick inserted in the  middle comes out clean. Cool in pans 10-15 minutes, remove from pans and  cool on wire rack. (If using small 1-lb. loaf pans, bake 45-55 min.

Grilled Zucchini

Richard Gruchalla, Duluth

Cut them length-wise into fours, rub them with olive oil, salt, pepper, and any herbs that you like, and grill them until they have slightly soft middles and brown 'grill marks' Turn them once or twice to make sure they get done on all sides.

Ravioli With Sautéed Zucchini  Serves 4

Jan Attridge. Grand Marais 

1 pound cheese ravioli (fresh or frozen)

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 small zucchini, sliced into thin half-moons

kosher salt and pepper

2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

1/2 cup grated Parmesan (2 ounces)

Cook the ravioli according to the package directions. Drain them and return to the pot.

 Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the zucchini, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper and cook until just tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 2 minutes.

 Add the zucchini mixture and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan to the ravioli and toss gently to combine. Serve with the remaining 1/4 cup of Parmesan.


Apple Zucchini Cake

Ann Rosenquist, Grand Marais

4 lg. eggs

1 c. vegetable oil

2 c. sugar

2 c. peeled and grated zucchini, drained

3 c. unsifted flour

1 tsp soda

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp nutmeg

1/2 tsp baking powder

2 tsp vanilla

1 c chopped nuts

2 1/3 c peeled and chopped apples

Grease and flour tube pan. Beat eggs, add oil, sugar, zucchini and vanilla. Mix well. Sift  together flour, soda, baking powder, salt and spices. Add to creamed mixture. add apples and nuts. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour 15 minutes.

 

Zucchini Bread 

 
Ann Rinkenberger, Scandia

 

3 eggs 

2 cups sugar 

2 cups grated zucchini (leave green on) 

1 cup oil 

2 teaspoon vanilla 


Beat eggs and add the rest. Add: 

3 cups flour 

3 tsp. cinnamon 

1 tsp. soda 

1 tsp. baking powder 

1/2 cup nuts (optional) 


Grease 2 loaf pans. Pour in batter. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 hour

Here’s a great smoothie for kids to make. They love it,, and it has spinach in it!

Mud Slime Smoothie -- a Kid's Favorite

Diane Booth, Cook County Extension,  and the Treasure Gardeners Youth Gardening group

2 c frozen spinach

2 c frozen strawberries. (this also works with fresh fruit, like blueberries.)

1 banana

2 TBSP honey

1/2 c .ice and 1/2 c. water

Pick fresh spinach, freeze on cookie sheets for recipe, or use frozen spinach.

Put 1/2 c. water in bottom of blender. Add the banana. Blend.

Add honey, frozen bruit and small bits of the spinach a little at a time with the ice until all ingrediants have been added.

Here some other great recipes submitted by fans:


Cilantro pesto butter

Staci Drouillard, Grand Marais

I just whir up the cilantro in a food processor with some green onions, garlic, S&P, fresh jalepenos to your liking and lime juice. When it's a paste I drizzle in some olive oil. Then I mix it up with a pound of soft butter and make small portions of it for the freezer. It's DELICIOUS on grilled fish, on vegetables, pasta, steak, you name it!!!


Tomatoes and Tarragon

Ann Possis, Lutsen

Fresh tomatoes and lots of fresh tarragon, dressed with the best mayo you can find, and a teeny bit of Lawry's seasoned salt.


Easy Sauerkraut

Mary Igoe, Grand Marais

Ingredients: Cabbage (the amount depends on how much you want to make)

Canning salt

Sugar

Shred cabbage and pack tightly into quart jars up to 1/2 inch from the top. This is easiest with a wide mouth jar.

Add 1 teaspoon each of canning salt and sugar to each quart.

Pour in boiling water to cover the cabbage.  Gently insert a knife in the jar to remove any trapped air.

Put on canning lids and screw on LOOSELY.  Put the jars in a sink or pan, as they may bubble over. Let ferment for 24 hours.

 Remove the caps, spoon off any scum that may have formed and add boiling water as necessary to cover the cabbage.  Seal as TIGHTLY as you can with your hand.

 Let ferment for 3 days.  This does not smell like fresh roses, so you may want to put it in the basement or some less traveled part of the house.

After three days process for 20 minutes in a boiling water bath.  Store a minimum of three weeks before eating.


Cabbage Salad with Peanuts

Mary Igoe, Grand Marais

In a large bowl, mash together:  1/4 cup natural, unsalted peanut butter  and 1/2 cup hot water

Add:  1/2 cup plus 1 TBSP rice or cider vinegar (rice is best)

        3 TBSP brown sugar

       1 1/2 tsp salt

       1 TBSP soy or tamari sauce

       1 tsp sesame oil

Add:  7 to 8 packed cups of shredded green cabbage.  Mix well

Sprinkle in and mix: crushed red pepper, to taste

Cover the bowl tightly and refrigerate for a minimum of 4 hours, stirring it every once in a while.

Sprinkle with 1/2 cup peanuts right before serving (I serve the peanuts in a separate bowl and everyone sprinkles on their own to avoid soggy peanuts in the leftovers.)

This is rather soupy, so serve with a slotted spoon.

Fresh Basil Pesto
Submitted by Ann Rosenquist

Ingredients
2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan Reggiano or Romano cheese (leave out cheese if freezing)
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup pine nuts, walnuts or roasted, unsalted sunflower seeds
3 medium-sized garlic cloves, minced
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

A food processor makes this a lot easier.

Combine the basil with the nuts and pulse a few times in a food processer. Add the garlic, pulse a few times more.
Slowly add the olive oil in a constant stream while the food processor is on. Stop to scrape down the sides with a rubber spatula. Add the grated cheese and pulse again until blended. Add a pinch of salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste.
Makes 1 cup.
Serve with pasta or over baked potatoes, or spread over toasted baguette slices.
(Source: Simplyrecipes.com)

Garden Veggie Pesto Pasta
Becky Stoner, Grand Marais 

 

Ingredients:
1 pound of your favorite pasta ( I use rotini so it holds more pesto)
olive oil
parmesan cheese
pine nuts
2 cups of your favorite garden vegetables, cut up small ( I like carrots, broccoli and cauliflower for color and texture)
1/2 to 1 c pesto to taste

Cook the pasta for 2 minutes less than the full time listed on the package.
Keep it in the pan and add the vegetables to the pasta and boiling water for that last 2 minutes and turn up the heat.
Drain pasta and vegetables. Do not rinse.
Return them to the pan and add pesto and some some olive oil to dilute the pesto a little. Stir to blend.
Add pine nuts and parmesan cheese in it or on top, to taste.
Vary the amounts based on what you like. Eat hot or cold.
For leftovers ( if there are any!) store well in fridge and reheat with a little water added.

Enjoy!

 
Program: 

 
Del Rosenquist picks raspberries in his Grand Marais garden/photo Joan Farnam

Men in the Garden

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july15.mp390.13 MB

Jan Horak and Del Rosenquist talked about men and gardening on the July 15 Northern Gardening Show. Listen here. 

Program: 

 
Canada Thistle

All about those pesky garden weeds

WTIP’s Northern Gardening


Weeds in the Garden and Invasive Weeds in Cook County

This program aired from 4-5 p.m. Thursday, July 1.
The guests were Molly Thompson, Sugarloaf Interpretive Center executive director and Ann Rosenquist, CSA grower and U of M Master Gardener

The program was hosted by Diane Booth, Cook County Extension, and Joan Farnam, Northwoods Food Project

 
Photo: Canada Thistle

Molly Thompson, executive director of Sugarloaf, discussed invasive/noxious weeds on the program. Sugarloaf Cove will hold a workshop on identifying noxious weeds/invasive plants on Saturday, July 17 at 10 a.m.  Participants will learn how to identify non-native invasive plants, how they threaten our North Shore forests, and what you can do to control them on your property. All participants will receive a full color guide to invasive plants. Free.

Also, if you want some hands-on experience to help you identify invasives and learn how to control them, Sugarloaf is holding “Attacking Invasive Work Days” every Thursday at 10 a.m. in July and August. The public is invited. 

For more on Sugarloaf Cove, visit www.sugarloafnorthshore.org/ 

Here is a site that has photos and discussion of the primary noxious weeds in Minnesota. www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/DG5620.html

And here’s an interesting boadleaf and grass weed seedling identification key from the U of M Extension office:

www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/cropsystems/DC2928.pdf

 

Here are excerpts from the program notes about weeds in your garden. 

 

What is a weed?

A plant that is in the wrong place. 

For example: Some orchids in Hawaii are considered weeds, so are nhasturtiums in California.

What about the dandelion? When it comes to nutritional value, Taraxacum officinale is no slouch. The plant is rich in vitamins C, A and D, iron, calcium, magnesium and potassium. And, it gets good marks as a source of fiber and vegetable protein. It was brought here to provide greens. 

Why have we come to look upon the dandelion with a jaundiced eye? Quite likely, it was the idea of a perfect lawn that prompted us to take up arms against this esteemed plant. Now,

the dandelion’s commercial value stems mostly from the arsenal of weapons we purchase to use against it.

 

Or, as Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote: “A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered.” 

 

What is the difference between a common ordinary weed and a weed that is considered to be invasive?

The important biological difference between invasive plants and garden weeds is the ability of invasive plants to disperse, establish, and spread without human assistance or

disturbance. Because of this, they are much more problematic in natural environments than are typical weeds.

Here are some suggestions about what to do about weeds.

1 . Healthy, vigorous plants are the best defense against weeds. Make sure your plants are not under stress such as lack of water, drought, temperature or poor drainage.

2 . Plant species or varieties that are best suited for the environment you are planting them in.

3 . Make sure your soil is nutritious – low fertility may encourage more weeds.

4 . Don’t overuse fertilizers or herbicides.

5 . Mowing, tilling or weeding practices are very important to reduce weeds (2” deep). However, every time you till or dig you are bringing up more of those dormant seeds and may be allowing them to germinate.

6 . Actively use as much of your garden space as possible so there are fewer places for weed seeds.

7 . Actively monitor your landscape or garden so you can catch weed issues early on.


Important things to know about weeds to help control them:

• Use herbicides only as a last resort, and then  sparingly.

• Follow IPM (Integrated Pest Management): Balancing a weed-free garden with a healthy environment.

• Know what species your weeds are so you know if they are a spring annual, a fall annual, a biennial or a perennial weed. Your management techniques will vary based upon the knowledge you have about the plant and its life cycle.

 

Spring / Summer Annuals: Germinate in the spring and mature during the summer like crabgrass, foxtail grass, knotweed. They only live one year. Allowing 2-4 inches of mulch to remain on the soil in the spring will prevent these spring annuals from germinating without sunlight.

Planting early spring ground covers like wild ginger, violets, or lamiastrum can compete with the weed

seeds and reduce the vigor of the weeds. 

**Some ground covers can become invasive, so you need to know which ones to avoid, like goutweed (Aegopodium podagraria). Call the Extension office at 387-3015 for more information.

 

Fall/Winter Annuals: Germinate in the fall, usually overwinter and then bloom and form seeds in the spring. Only live one year.

1 . Examples are chickweed (Stellaria media) field penny

cress (Thlaspi arvense), Shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-

pastoris). Eradication of these in the fall when younger

and weaker is better than waiting until the following spring.

A cover crop like winter rye (Secale cereal) can help

reduce the fall or winter annuals germinating by providing

competition.

2 . Early cultivation in the spring can also help to eradicate

these fall / winter annuals. Plant early growing vegetables

in these spaces like spinach or broccoli (cool-season crops).

That will shade out and maybe prevent germination of

these fall / winter annuals.

 

Biennial Weeds: Take two years for their life cycle and they

die. Usually green foliage the first year and flowers and seeds

the second year. These are often grouped with perennial weeds

because usually the control measures you take against them are the same as perennial weeds. Bull thistle, spotted knapweed, mullein, garlic mustard are all examples.

 

Perennial Weeds: Usually have thick, fleshy roots that can store

lots of food so they can come back again and again and again…it

takes time and effort to get rid of these. Often will reproduce

both by seed and by stolons, rhizomes and small pieces of roots

left behind. Some may have an allelopathic effect on plants

surrounding them. Examples are Canada thistle, orange hawkweed

and quackgrass.

Cut down the weeds in the area you want to plant. Cover with an old carpet or something thick and heavy, weigh it down with rocks. Periodically over the year, remove the carpet, remove any of the weeds that have come up, and then replace with the carpet. Over a year of maybe two – all of the energy reserves in the root

have been depleted.

 

Lasagna gardening is another way folks start a new garden in an area where grass/weeds are already growing. 

To build one,  pile organic matter like leaves over a proposed garden area, cover with heavy black plastic or landscape fabric and weigh it down. Leave for at least one to two years. Lift up the plastic and you will find a nice garden bed area.

To create a lasagna garden in an existing garden, put down newspaper and then about 4 inches of mulch. 

 

Other ways to control weeds:

•  Use rhubarb leaves as mulch over the areas you want to cover.

•  Remove weeds, grass the area over and keep it mowed repeatedly. The grass may choke out the weeds. Then you can go back and remove the sod to plant the area.

•  Root attack – Take a broad fork and dig up all the roots you can, sift the soil to remove as many pieces of the roots as possible. Then be very vigilant to remove any other pieces that show up.

•  Leaf attack – Keep removing all the leaves and over time it will hopefully drain the resources of the plant. This does not work well if it is attached via rhizomes or stolons to other plants nearby and you are not removing those leaves.

Individual root attack – one root at a time – dandelion, sow thistle, etc.  You can make weeding easier and remove more of the roots if you weed right after a rain when the soil has been loosened up (don’t compact the already wet soil).

Flame throwing or burning is most effective on annual weeds but not perennial or biennial weeds.

• Dig it up and start over. If 30% or more of your perennial garden is infested with weeds you may want to pot up your perennials so you can attack the weeds and eradicate as many as possible. Dig out as many as possible, remove as many by hand as you can, maybe even sift the soil for root fragments and then replant and mulch.

Perhaps the most important tip is --- keep on top of the weeds in your garden. Getting them out when they're just sprouting is a lot easier and more effective. And, if at all possible, get them out before they bloom.

For questions or comments, call WTIP at 387-1070 or e-mail radiodiva@wtip.org. For questions about weeds and controls, call Diane Booth at the Cook County Extension office at 387-3015.
And thanks for listening!

 

 

 

Program: 

 
Making apple cider

Learn about berries and Fruits

 Growing fruits and berries was discussed on Northern Gardening March 18. It will be rebroadcast at 6 a.m. Saturday, March 20.
Here are two recipes for preserving apples  submitted by Kristine Bottorff, a member of the Northwooods Food Project who was on the program this week. She is pictured making cider with her husband (right) and Ben and Korey Steckelberg last fall.
Here are Kristine's recipes:

From "The Big Book of Preserving the Harvest" by Carol Costenbader:


Ginger Jam

2 lemons
8 medium-sized tart apples, peeled, cored, and sliced, about 7 cups
2 1/2 cups water
1 teaspoon ground ginger
6 cups sugar
1/2 cup crystallized ginger, finely chopped

1. Peel the lemons, reserving the zest.  Cut the peeled lemons in half and squeeze the juice. Reserve the juice.
2. In an 8-quart saucepan, cook the apples, water, lemon zest, lemon juice, and ground ginger until the apples are soft.  Add the sugar and stir until dissolved.
3. Boil the mixture rapidly for 15 minutes, stirring frequently, until a candy thermometer reaches 220 degrees F.
4. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the crystallized ginger.  Skim off any foam and let stand for 10 minutes.
5. Pour it into clean jars, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace.  Cap and seal.
6. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath canner.

Applesauce

Enough apples to nearly fill your biggest stock pot
Water
Lemon juice
cinnamon
sweetener, your choice

1. Scrub apples with a brush.  Cut out bad spots and cut into pieces into the stock pot. The smaller the pieces, the shorter the cooking time.  Removing stems and knocking at least some of the seeds out makes the later processing easier.
2. Add enough water to keep the bottom from scorching while it cooks (typically 1/2 C - 1 C).  Cook, stirring often, until apples are evenly soft.
3. Remove from heat. It may be easier to let the apples cool some before the next step. Get remaining ingredients and canning equipment ready.
4. Process apples through a food mill to remove peelings, seeds and core material.  This is a good "kid helper" job.  Return to the stock pot on medium heat.
5. Add lemon juice, cinnamon and sweetener to taste.  I usually use 2 tsp. cinnamon and 1/4 C lemon juice. Sweetener really depends on the kind and ripeness of the apples.  Stir often while it heats, carefully; boiling applesauce can cause burns. A flat-bladed wooden paddle is a good tool for this. It doesn't need to cook, but it does need to be hot enough not to expand more after it's in the jar.
6. Ladle into clean, hot quart or pint jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Cap and seal. Process in a boiling water bath canner for 20 minutes (both sizes).
>>>>>

Program: 

 
Dave steckelberg

Dave Steckelberg talks about the GardenShare program on Northern Gardening

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Dave Steckelberg, above, has been participating in the GardenShare program for four seasons. He is pictured in the red cabbage patch in his garden. He was interviewed on the Northern Gardening show recently and  talks about his experience with the GardenShare, a program of the Northwoods Food Project.

Learn more about the GardenShare program.

Find out about available garden spaces.

Can you help? Find out where folks have requested garden space.

Program: