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Northern Sky

East Bay Moon Crescent/Photo by Stephan Hoglund

Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota. She authors the Minnesota Starwatch column, and contributes to WTIP bi-weekly on the Monday North Shore Morning program through "Northern Sky," where she shares what's happening with stars, planets and more.

 


What's On:
Orion Nebula (Alex Gorstan/Flickr)

Northern Sky: New Year, New Astronomical Milestones

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains how you can catch perihelion, Venus and Saturn in the morning sky, the Orion complex and much more at the beginning of the new year.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Capella, brightest star in the constellation Auriga, is the bright object in the upper left corner (Cano Vaoaori/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Winter Solstice & Constellations

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains what to expect in the sky over the holidays, including the winter solstice and the cluster of winter constellations that are coming into their own.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Curiosity Rover Lifts Off for Mars (NASA/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Perseus, Mercury & Mars in December

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains what stands out in the sky this December (Perseus & Algol, a waning crescent moon, and the Geminid meteor shower) and the latest in astronomy news (the discovery of ice on Mercury and the findings of the first soil analysis from NASA's Mars rover, Curiosity).

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Jupiter (LeydenBlue/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Jupiter dominates in late November

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains the apparition of Jupiter, one of the brightest objects in the sky; its opposition (which is supposed to be a nice one); and how to differentiate it from the stars around it by location and color. We can also see Venus and Saturn, the November full moon, and much more.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Moon, Venus & Jupiter (Frankzed/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Opposites in November

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. We're getting into mid-November now, and this year, the biggest thing is how the two brightest planets are playing opposites. Learn more in this edition of Northern Sky.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Jupiter (bright object at top of photo), Venus and The Moon (Dave Schumaker/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Jupiter, opposition and more in October

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In the second half of October, we get a closer look at Jupiter, Venus is in the morning sky, there's a full "hunters" moon, and much more.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Crescent Moon (Robert Snache/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Regulus, Antaries & the October moon

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.In this first part of October, you can check out a waning crescent moon west of Regulus, the brightest star in Leo; Mars and the bright star Antaries in Scorpio; and much more.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
The Andromeda galaxy is visible this month (find it at the bottom-center of the above photo, above the 'v' of the hills)

Northern Sky: Autumn Constellations

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains some of the autumn constellations and other objects that we can see this time of year: the Great Square of Pegasus, the Andromeda galaxy, the circlet of Pisces, and the Y-shaped "Water Jar," an asterism in Aquarius. There's also the Harvest Moon, Venus & Regulus in the morning sky, and much more.

Read this month's Starwatch column.

Photo courtesy of Eric Magnuson via Flickr.
 


 
Crescent Moon & Venus (Jan Kalab/Flickr)

Northern Sky: September Brings A Striking Morning Sky

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains some of the great things to see in the morning sky this September: new & crescent moons, the autumnal equinox, and much more.

Read this month's Starwatch column.

Check out Deane's story on the U of M's role in exploring the Van Allen Belt.


 
If you look along the Milky Way, you should see three bright stars: the summer triangle (Top to Bottom: Deneb, Vega & Altair)

Northern Sky: Gaining Constellations, Losing a Few Old Friends

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains what's going on during the end of August and the beginning of September. During this time, we should pay special attention to the morning sky, and catch Jupiter, Venus and the Hyades star cluster. In the evening sky, we have a full moon on August 31, the summer triangle of stars, and much more. Learn more in this edition of Northern Sky.

Read this month's Starwatch column.

Photo courtesy of Cano Vaari via Flickr.