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Northern Sky

East Bay Moon Crescent/Photo by Stephan Hoglund

Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota. She authors the Minnesota Starwatch column, and contributes to WTIP bi-weekly on the Monday North Shore Morning program through "Northern Sky," where she shares what's happening with stars, planets and more.

 


What's On:
There's a lot to see in the night & daytime skies in mid-September (Photo Fiddler/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Harvest Moon, Waning Daylight & More In Mid-Sept.

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

In the second two weeks of September, there's a lot going on in both the morning and the evening skies. In this edition, Deane explains some of the things to check out during this time.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
There's a lot to see in the night sky in late August & early September (Mike Lewinski/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Saturn, Spica & Beehive Cluster in Early Sept.

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

The last days of August and the first days of September are full of activity that you need no more than binoculars - or even just a clear sky - to see. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane gives us the lowdown and what's worth catching, including a thin crescent moon which points us to Venus, Saturn and Spica, in Virgo. You can also catch the "beehive" star cluster.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
See the Sturgeon moon. Photo by RalphHightower via Flickr.

Northern Sky: Catch the Sturgeon Moon this August

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

This month, see the full sturgeon moon, Venus in the west, and the star Vega.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Learn more about what there is to see in the night sky during mid-May (satosphere/Flickr)

Northern Sky: In mid-May, catch Jupiter, Saturn, Corvus

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

During mid-May, the main attractions are Jupiter and Saturn. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains the best time to see these fascinating planets, as well as some of the other eye-catching sights to see astronomy-wise in the next few weeks.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Check out the Spring constellations during the end of April & beginning of May (David DeHetre/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Eta Aquarid Meteor Shower & more in early May

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

During the last part of April and beginning of May, Saturn reaches opposition, catch the Spring constellations, the Eta Aquarid meteor shower and more.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Comet PanSTARRS (Luis Argerich/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Jupiter, Saturn & Comet PanSTARRS

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

In March, we get a new moon on the 11th, and you can catch Jupiter near the first quarter phase of the moon. Saturn is rising late in the evening and it's getting brighter, so it's a good time to see it with a telescope near Spica. You can also see comet PanSTARRS on Tuesday the 12th. Learn more in this edition of Northern Sky.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Andromeda Galaxy (Luis Argerich/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Mercury & Andromeda in February

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

In mid-February, you can catch Mercury (the "messenger") near a waxing moon. It's also a great time to catch Saturn and the Andromeda galaxy. Learn more in this edition of Northern Sky.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Winter constellations (Matt Swint/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Winter Stars & Saturn in West Quadrature

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column.

In the last week of January and first week of February, a waning moon means a better view of the winter stars (Capella, Aldebaran, Sirius, Procyon, Pollux and Castor, Betelgeuse and more). Jupiter is fading, but Saturn is coming into its own, and it will be at west quadrature on January 30. Learn more in this edition of Northern Sky.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Orion Nebula (Alex Gorstan/Flickr)

Northern Sky: New Year, New Astronomical Milestones

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains how you can catch perihelion, Venus and Saturn in the morning sky, the Orion complex and much more at the beginning of the new year.

Read this month's Starwatch column.


 
Capella, brightest star in the constellation Auriga, is the bright object in the upper left corner (Cano Vaoaori/Flickr)

Northern Sky: Winter Solstice & Constellations

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Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota, where she authors the Minnesota Starwatch column. In this edition of Northern Sky, Deane explains what to expect in the sky over the holidays, including the winter solstice and the cluster of winter constellations that are coming into their own.

Read this month's Starwatch column.