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Wildersmith on the Gunflint

Fred Smith

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Fred Smith
Fred Smith, a native Iowan re-located to the wilderness of border country at the end of the century, has been writing of happenings in the upper Gunflint territory for going on eight years, first with the local paper, and since December 2008 for WTIP North Shore Community Radio. Fred feels life in the woods is extraordinary, and finds reporting on it to both a reading and listening audience a pleasurable challenge. Since retirement as a high school athletic administrator from Ankeny High School, Ankeny Iowa in 1999, the pace of Fred's life has become less hectic but nevertheless, remains busy in new ways with many volunteer activities along the Trail. Listen at your convenience by subscribing to a podcast.


Arts, cultural and history features on WTIP are made possible in part by funding from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Check out other programs and features funded in part with support from the Heritage Fund.

 

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint: August 21

Gunflint’s August week three is complete. After a miserable few “dog days” in the second segment, our weather has reverted to more tolerable conditions.

How hot was it? It was so uncomfortable both I and my glass of lemonade were in a constant sweat. Meanwhile, moose, bears and the like throughout our animal kingdom had to be suffering, too, in the sudden tropics around 48 degrees north. This spell hung on for what seemed like an eternity until a cooling northwester broke the panting last Sunday. My moose friends and I are looking for a continuance of the fall journey as my scribing hits the air waves.

Our venture toward autumn is on the move in spite of the daily roasting experience. Colorful nuggets of the coming season are beginning to hang heavy on their branches. Highbush cranberries and mountain ash berry cronies are in rapid transition to harvest crimson. Further, those ruby jewels of the forest, wild rose hips, dangle brightly in their prickly thickets awaiting a finishing frost, adding yet another tint to our green landscape.

Speaking of the approaching harvest time, the ritual for avian migration southward is on the upswing. While some species might have already hit the flyway, uncountable male hummingbirds have been fueling up at our sweet juice station over the past ten days in prep for their trip. It’s amazing these mini-birds drink as much as they do. Over the past week, we have been making a one cup batch of nectar every other day. And the competition for drinking rights has been fierce.

In yet another pre-flight situation, loon pairs are gathering in their usual groupings making plans to head out soon. At the same time, their off-spring remain calm and collected while fattening up and exploring the innate GPS that will get them to the Gulf shores in a few weeks after mom and dad take off.

A chart topping angling experience was shared with me recently. It surely must be a fishing story surpassing any one's mind might conjure up. The scene was on the east Bay of Saganaga Lake near the Chik-Wauk Museum site. The subjects were absolute “master fishers,” ones who seldom are denied a catch, “real pros.”

On this particular day, a member of the resident loon pair was observed shortly after a successful dive. The big bird surfaced with a sizeable finny, and was struggling in the process of devouring such.

A competing fish lover must have been watching from afar and decided to take things into its own hands, or in this case, talons. Without warning, an eagle plunged toward the loon and snatched lunch from the startled bird. A flurry of confusion and loon hollering was to no avail as Mr. or Ms. America soared off into the heavens, lunch intact, not to be seen again. One has to assume, like most fisher men, after the “big one” got away, this neatly attired critter was back at it sooner, rather than later (after its heart settled down).

Speaking further of fishy things, the MNDNR has been doing some netting for walleyes, lake trout and herring here on Gunflint Lake. This is part of ongoing research conducted every three years. It will be nice to hear what their efforts produced upon completion.

What looked to be the largest turn-out ever showed up at the mid-Trail fund raising bash last week? As usual, the doings were smashing with a record total of some $12,000 being tallied for the Trail Volunteer Fire and Rescue folks.

On top of being a wonderful social event, attendees made the usual auction a rollicking good time trying to out-bid one another on dozens of donated, artisans’ items. In the final event of the afternoon, the uniquely crafted quilt by the mid-Trail quilters was raffled off. Out of over 850 chances sold, Ruth Westby, who lives on Clearwater road off the Trail, had her name drawn. Congrats to Ruth on her good fortune, and thanks to the dozens of mid-Trail folks joining hands to organize this special annual event.

In closing this week's Gunflint scoop, the centennial celebration at Clearwater last Saturday evening was hugely spectacular. With so many kin of pioneer founders Charlie and Petra Boostrom on hand and subsequent owners of the Lodge and outfitting business in attendance, perhaps a million memories were relived in the hallowed lodge and on the ever-popular front porch. With great food and conversation, nostalgia reigned supreme while the great North Shore Community Swing Band played away the sunset into darkness. What a sweet “Clearwater” revival.

This is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith. The Gunflint is gunning for a summer ending and a fall beginning, don’t miss it!

(Photo by Jason Mrachina on Flickr)

 

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint: August 14

Upper Gunflint weather has been on the pleasant side during our first August stanza. In fact, whatever normal might be, it has been right on point. It’s been so nice we have come through the infamous “dog days” of the month unscathed by miserable heat and humidity.

Those dealing in weather lore say depending one’s latitudinal location, the “dog days” of summer will end on August 11. Let's hope their foretelling holds until the beginning of real autumnal cooling.

By the way, I recently read some month eight data by a Steve Gottschalk. Mr. G is a self-taught weather observer and student of climatic folklore. He states, “August sheds one hour and fifteen minutes of daylight between the first and last days.” Guess I would never have thought to count the minutes lost in our cyclical count-down. This in mind, is it any wonder daylight seems to dwindle so quickly this time of year. Where have all the minutes gone, gone to nighttime every one.”

Just when agencies monitoring wildfire conditions in the area finally acknowledged publicly we were in a bad drought circumstance, “Mother Nature” baled the territory out late this past Saturday afternoon with a gully-washing downpour. Much thunder and lightning accompanied the spotty storm along with hail in some locales. In the end, residents out this way measured from one-half to as much as two inches, thus tempering wildfire potential for the short term.

As the storm was winding down near sunset, a final surge somewhere in the territory knocked out electric service along the Mile O Pine. The few folks in our neighborhood sat in the dark for slightly over two and one-quarter hours.

Kudos are extended to sheriff's office dispatch and those great line technicians from Arrowhead Electric Coop for their quick attention to our dilemma. Their timely action is especially noted knowing AEC service people had to come from headquarters in Lutsen, which is an hour and one-half drive, and then locate, for repair of the interruption problem.

Once again we are grateful for their commitment to us. And by the way, there was enough concern we received a phone call from the sheriff's office shortly after power was restored to confirm our being up and running. Thanks to all!

As mentioned last week, month eight is that of the Ojibwe, full “blueberry moon,” or it can also be tabbed the “sturgeon moon” by other Native Americans. Not only is August known for this “blueberry lunar” occurrence, it is further recognized as the month of “tall weeds.” This label is more than confirmed along our Mile O Pine and most likely other back country roads. Some wild grass species seem “high as an elephant's eye.”

After a busy week on the Gunflint activity calendar, another event pops up to catch our attention. The good folks down at Clearwater Lodge and Outfitters are proudly celebrating their centennial year of outfitting business along the Trail, yes, one hundred years!

Festivities are open to the public. Things will commence around the Lodge tomorrow night (Saturday). A BBQ/cook-out is planned for all attendees beginning at 5:00 pm, and musical entertainment from the “North Shore Community Swing Band” will follow beginning around 7:00 extending until 9:00.

The happening looks to be a real “eatin’, singin’ and dancin’ hoedown” at this historic Gunflint attraction. Everyone come and share anniversary kudos with Clearwater on this milestone occasion.

Fast forward a few weeks to the Labor Day Holiday and mark your calendar for the yearly pie & ice cream social up on the Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center grounds. Sponsored by the Gunflint Trail Historical Society, sweet treat serving will happen from 11:00 am until 4:00 pm on Sunday September 6.

Volunteers to provide pies are always needed. Area residents willing to offer up a pastry delight can give Sally Valentini a call at 388-0900, and thanks in advance.

The Museum gift shop will also be holding its annual driveway/sidewalk sale during the same hours so bring Christmas gift lists and beat the mall madness of “black Friday,” at this magical “end of the Trail” place!

This is a beautiful time of the year for a trek to Trail's end. Plan to reunite with friends and neighbors, eat, shop and check out construction progress on the new Nature Center building.

This is Fred Smith, on the Trail, at Wildersmith. Beauty and adventure is yours to capture along the Gunflint!

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Gunflint Lake

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: August 7

A week into this month and our Gunflint weather has mellowed from the last ghastly segment of July. Cooling northern air settled over the area and a brief thundershower in the wee hours of last Sunday morning calmed the dust in this neighborhood. Although the rain was not of major consequence, the dropping dampened the thirsty forest floor for at least a day or so.

Chapter eight of the year was ushered in on winds to remind us of November gales. As I commence this week's Trail review, three consecutive days has seen Gunflint Lake and her sky-blue cousins thrashing in frenzy.

The geographical alignment of the lake outside our door makes her most temperamental when prevailing west-northwesterly air comes barreling down “the pike” in earnest. In fact, the “old gal” is most unforgiving of anyone who does not give her respect during times of wrestling with the gales.

I know of at least three near disasters during the rough seas of last weekend here on Gunflint Lake. Two involved canoers having to seek refuge assistance while another episode found two boaters caught in a violent storm-front surge which ended up with an emergency stop at the Wildersmith dock.

In both instances the lake-faring navigators were experienced folks, but ended up being no match for the fury of our angry Gunflint waters. All were well taken care of by friendly, accommodating Gunflint south shore residents. So all is well that ended well!

Our dockside observations provided a seldom seen aquatic trek up the lake one evening last week. This adventure occurred during a somewhat calmer time of the recent blustery sequence. The fact of the matter is this incident took place in the hour or so prior to the storm front surge mentioned above.

Heading eastward (up the lake) three innovative canoeing parties had apparently conceived a plan to take advantage of the breezy conditions. Aligning themselves side by side, a tarp (maybe it was a canopy top) was stretched between the two outer canoes at the bows with rear corners of the resulting sail anchored in the hands of two comrades in the sterns. Meanwhile the third unit was sandwiched in between with the stern paddler of this canoe steering the catamaran like craft.

The crew seemed quite experienced in sailing maneuvers as they cruised by us on-lookers in no time at all. Apparently headed toward a rendezvous at Camper's Island, they soon disappeared from view. I’m guessing they beat the storm to a shore side campsite, or maybe they’re caught up in the trees near Bridal Falls still hanging onto their sail. In any event, it was intriguing to watch them battle the rolling waters.

The upper Gunflint heads off into week two of this month of the “Blueberry Moon” (Miinike Giizis) focused on a busy next few days. Sunday is a chamber music concert, Gunflint Woods, Winds and Strings. It begins at 4:00 pm in the Mid-Trail (Schaap) Community Center. Requests for last minute seating reservations can be made by calling Susan at 388-9494. At this writing, it is unknown if seating remains available.

Scheduled for the next day, Monday (the 10th) is the August meeting of the Gunflint Trail Historical Society. This gathering begins at 1:30 pm in the Seagull Lake Community Center. The program will feature Earl Niewald, retired USFS/Gunflint District Ranger who served during the BWCA controversies of the late 1970’s. This should be an interesting historical reflection! Treats will again be served after the program.

Then on this coming Wednesday, August 12, the annual Mid-Trail fundraising bash for the Trail Volunteer Fire and EMS crews takes center stage. The Flea Market, Gift Boutique, Auction and Quilt Raffle commences at 1:00 pm in the Schaap Community Center. This is always an energetic event, especially the often hilarious bidding wars for some great handcrafted items by local artisans. Come early and stay late, for the big quilt drawing around 4:00 pm. Soft drinks and baked goods will also be on sale. Be there or be square!

The Gunflint summer has whizzed by. In the minds of some out this way, summer is over after July 4 while others say it's “kaput” following the downtown Fisherman’s Picnic.

This thought is being confirmed by “Mother Nature,” too, as the ground level flora, dogbane, is now golden along area roadsides and a few birch trees and young maples are beginning temper chlorophyll production in this time of dwindling daylight minutes. And according to the Minnesota DNR, the August stanza also shows lake water temps peaking during this first week and slowly trending southward from this point forward. So the beacon of fall is beginning to glow!

This is Fred Smith, at Wildersmith, on the trail, don’t miss the unused warm season days up the Gunflint!

(Photo by David Griffin Photography)

 

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Fireweed

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 31

For non-believers in this Global Warming thing, sure hope they’re enjoying the roast! The upper Gunflint has not been spared over the past week, and these lousy hot temps are getting a lot of folks down.

As I prepare this week's commentary, no break is foreseen in the forecast. It’s forcing the moose and me to lay pretty low after mid-morning. Then again, being retired, I quit most work-related chores at noon anyway.

Guess we can consider ourselves fortunate in one aspect as the humidity has been bad enough, but not complicated with additional moisture. Then on the other hand, another week with nary a drop of rain around this neighborhood and the fuel load throughout the forest has grown tinder dry. The agencies charged with monitoring forest conditions are not being too public with concern, but we who live here know it’s dangerously dry on the wilderness floor.

This in mind, it would be a good idea for area residents and businesses to crank up the wildfire sprinkler systems (WFSS). Doing this not only assures their unit is in readiness, but also acts to dampen down property holdings.

I’ve found that an hour or so of WFSS operation in the early evening can do wonders cooling the house down during these miserable warm days. It makes for much more comfortable sleeping conditions if one does not have artificial cooling.

All this being said in regard to our atmosphere, it’s nice to bid this crabby hot July farewell. One positive, while planet earth bids this chapter adieu, if skies are clear we will be blessed with the “blue moon” on her last day.

The “thunder” moon, as it's called by Algonquin tribes, sends us off into August. The hope in these parts is those notorious “dog days” of month eight will be few and far between.

This magnificent million-square-mile wildflower patch continues blooming its fool head off. Early blossoms are fading to seeds while mid-summer varieties have taken over. It’s a time for drifts of Daisies, Black-eyed Susans and Fire Weed to escort one’s trip along the Byway.

A local fishing guide shared a recent experience he had not encountered in over 20 years of hosting fishing excursions. His angling customers were taken out on an area lake in search of big Northern Pike, and I was told they did get their wishes, but nothing extraordinary. Near the end of the day, one of the catch was released. No sooner had it hit the water, than an eagle appeared from high in the sky and swooped in for its catch of the hour.

If that wasn’t enough of a thrill for this fishing party, moments later a bear swam by their craft. It actually came close enough to provide some great photo ops. What a wonderful wild woods and water gift.

Later, as the group trailered the boat to head home, a trifecta of critter observations was completed when a moose met them on the road away from the launching access. One could not have scripted a better north woods encounter. This northern reality show will no doubt be etched in these folks’ memories for a lifetime, and probably will lure them back to this wilderness paradise often.

Fishing fortunes here at Wildersmith are not often met with success. In all likelihood, it’s because we aren’t fanatics about doing such. However, the grandsons were here for a visit last week and angling luck briefly turned around. On a trip up to Saganaga Lake, Tuesday before last, grandson, Lane Smith from Iowa, had the thrill of his young life. He hooked onto one of those Walleye “hawgs.” After an arm wrenching battle of several minutes he netted a 29-inch beauty. Lane says a big thanks to his guide, Adam!

It has been his family’s rule if anyone ever catches a “whopper,” it was going onto the wall. So this green and gold trophy was frozen and headed south for proper preservation and a “wall of fame” induction.

A week from this coming Sunday (August 9), the third annual Gunflint Woods, Winds and Strings chamber music concert will be presented at 4:00 pm in the mid-Trail (Schaap) Community facility. Many accomplished area professionals will be engaged in the collection of performing musicians. A reception will follow where one can meet and greet the players. Time is running out for seating reservations. If you haven’t reserved yours call Susan 388-9494 before it’s sold out.

This is Fred Smith, at Wildersmith, on the Trail. The great Gunflint Territory awaits you!

(Photo by Kenny Murray on Flickr)

 

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Wild blueberries

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 24

Gunflint area atmospheric conditions remain on the sticky side as I commence with this week's scoop. Rain has been on the scant side since my last scribing and back country roads not treated chemically swirl with vehicular dust storms at every passing.

Summer is now officially a month old as we pass this fourth of five Fridays in month seven. The many Gunflint Community events of the past month have kept a lot of folks so busy, July has slipped away, barely being noticed. Although a few more special Gunflint events are on tab in a couple weeks, the area gets a brief break to just slow down and enjoy the magic of tromping out in the green forest, canoeing or fishing sky blue waters, berry harvesting, catching a critter adventure or continuing the process of “getting ready for winter.”

Mosquitoes must be reloading somewhere because they have lessened their onslaught around here, at least for the time being. This has enabled me to stop procrastinating on a few summer projects from my pre-winter check list. With five structures to maintain, keeping up with preservation is ongoing. Thus I have begun staining one side of each building in the second year of a four year sequence. You just gotta love it!

Speaking of berry harvesting, those collecting gurus have rung the picking bell. Reports confirm the crop is less abundant than in the past few years. However, the first batch I saw in a serving bowl was deep blue and scrumptious as ever. Since the blue pearl crop is apparently not a bucket buster, a real battle could be shaping up between bear and mankind to get their fill. Pickers will want to be leery of “Brunos” who may not be so willing to share a sparse patch. This time of year usually finds Ursa confined to blues picking, but our meager fruit crop could have implications for increased traffic around areas of human inhabitance. All should beware of the necessity to be good housekeepers so as to not tempt the hungry critters into becoming troublesome.

I don’t know if recent bear looting up near the end of the Trail was caused by a lack of berry opportunities, but several repetitions of breaking and entering resulted in considerable damage to properties and scares to people. Eventually this annoying animal had to be dispatched to the “great hunting ground in the wild blue.” This is unfortunate, if in fact, we two-legged beings carelessly provided this four-legged animal with favorable circumstances for criminal activity.

Hummingbird traffic to area nectar stations is back on track. After probable nesting hiatus, the mini-drones are a blur both landing and taking off from our sweetness jar at Wildersmith. It’s obvious they must possess the most intricate global positioning system in the universe to be able to avoid mid-air collisions with not only each other and on occasion, yours truly, but also countless stationary obstacles is beyond wonder.

Speaking of more Gunflint wonders, The Gunflint Community and many others from around the county stepped up big time at last week's annual canoe races event. A final tally of proceeds in support of the Trail Volunteer Fire and Rescue crews counted a record net of slightly over $23,000. What a tremendous effort by all involved! Another congrats and thanks to everyone!

This is Fred Smith, at Wildersmith, on the Trail -- enjoy the peak of summer along the Gunflint!

(Photo by Cynthia Zullo on Flickr)

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 17

Having reached the halfway point in July, Gunflint weather has turned frightful for the moose and me. Although hot humid conditions have not been as bad in these parts as other places in the Midwest, it has nevertheless been uncomfortable for my ungulate friends and those of us who have a disdain for sweating. Meanwhile, those favoring stickiness of jungle-like tropics must be happy as clams.

A timely rain soaked the area earlier this week. And although this moisture added angst to our sticky air, it was nonetheless welcomed after minimal amounts the previous seven. After many days of smoky skies reflecting huge Canadian fires in Saskatchewan, we are thankful for the rain cleansing our air and tempering our own wildfire danger, at least for the time being.

The Gunflint forest is lush with green. It’s incredible how consuming “Mother Nature” is with regard to growing things. She certainly has the “master green thumb.” It seems in the blink of an eye, wild grass species along the Mile O Pine are six feet high. Taking this a step further, much of this grassy flora is presently going to seed as summer whizzes by. A faint glimmer of fall is in the distance.

As of last weekend, word from 3 area blueberry pickers tells of limited harvesting to date. However, by the time my scribing hits the air wave things could be turnin’ up blue in them “thar” patches.

One of these pickin’ “pros” did indicate there appears to be less fruit on upper branches than in past years. Her thought is late frost might have doomed some blossoms before the blackflies did their pollinating exercises. As I drive the Trail this season, it’s evident vast areas exposed by the Ham Lake Wildfire, creating perfect habitat for expanded berry development in recent years, have rapidly given way to sapling trees of many varieties. I’m no expert, but it would seem growing shade from the new forest generation will no doubt diminish many sun drenched areas of prolific berry production as years progress. However, like fisher folks with their hidden depths, long time berry picking masters will still have their secret spots so the blue pearls will be had by some.

There’s a conspiracy in select locations along the south shore of Gunflint Lake this summer. Fortunately not one schemed by some humans, but this arrangement is of a natural order. Several residents tell of more than usual numbers of raven families in this locale. There is also one such within ear shot of Wildersmith.

If one is not familiar with the naming of a group of ravens, Webster defines such as a “conspiracy,” thus our Gunflint Conspiracy. These glossy corvine beings (crow-like birds) can also be known as “unkindness.”

It would seem this “unkindness” tab to be more appropriate as their continual raucous conversation, particularly the youngsters, grows annoying after hours on end. Their vocal chords must be tougher than rawhide!

Another grouping in this “wild neighborhood” is frequenting our yard in growing numbers lately. However, I cannot find Webster being accountable for assigning a handle to more than one in this assemblage. I’m talking about at least a half dozen red squirrels gathering all at one time for some regular seed scrounging in a small grassy patch. With enough chatter to sometimes match the raven talk, it would be my thought the rodent groupies should be called “mayhem” because that’s what it is during their dining experience.

The thirty-ninth Gunflint Trail Canoe Races hit the waterfront at Gunflint Lodge this past Wednesday. As usual, a fine turn-out for the annual Volunteer Fire Department and EMS crew fundraiser witnessed more great community spirit and enthusiasm. Congratulations, and thanks to races Chairman Chris Steele and his nearly one hundred volunteers for putting on another splendid show.

The grand prize giveaway, that fabulous kayak from the Wenonah Canoe Company, found Clare Cardinal of Central Iowa as the lucky winner. More thanks are extended to many charitable county merchants and crafts people for donating prizes to the always exciting raffle drawings.

As one of dozens of volunteers at WTIP, and on behalf of all associated with broadcast production, a repeated thanks is extended to the over three hundred new and renewing members for their support of last week's “feelin’ groovy” celebration. It is heart-warming to have so many community radio followers step up to assure WTIP remains the vibrant resource it has become over the past eighteen years. We’ll all do our best to keep the radio waves hummin’ with tip of the Arrowhead and north shore spirit!

On a final note, seating reservations for the Gunflint Woods, Winds and Strings chamber music concert at the Schaap Community Center on August 9 continue on sale. Be reminded there are only 150 seats available, and the first two years of performances were sell-outs, so secure your spot for this classical performance ASAP by calling Susan at 388-9494.

This is Fred Smith at Wildersmith, on the Trail. Wilderness adventure awaits you on the Gunflint!

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Gunflint Trail Historical Society 10 Year Celebration, picture by Sally Valentini

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 10

Summer has turned the corner so to speak as daylight minutes begin to trickle away. Conditions in the upper Gunflint have been fairly normal, but did present a sticky spike last weekend. A couple sultry days gets old quick, and they had a number of us folks reflecting our appreciation for colder times ahead (not that we are wishing our life away).

As I keyed this week's Gunflint scoop, storm clouds were building and thunder was rumbling in the west. A good soaking would be welcomed as rain over the past week or so has been on the scant side. Talking of storm clouds, they bring back memory of the infamous July 4 sixteen years ago when this territory saw hundreds of thousands of acres devastated in an unheard of derecho. The area has since bounced back with phenomenal new growth even when one factors in wildfires in some of the same blowdown places during 2005, 2006 and the tragic 2007 inferno. In spite of marvelous recovery efforts by “Mother Nature,” with assistance from mankind, many places remain with a substantial risk-laden fuel load, keeping all of us on edge when it gets dry. So let it rain, but no blowing!

Blueberry pickers are anxious to hit the patches in search of their treasured nuggets. An early report relates it’s still a little early, with fruit on the plants, but more ripening time needed.

I heard of a recent wild woods encounter involving a moose, her calf and a hungry bear. The scene was observed by a fishing party up on Lake Saganaga, who during the episode turned out to be life savers. Things began to unfold as the fisher-people heard a crashing through the woods. Thinking it was probably a moose rambling through the timber they were surprised when a moose calf bolted out along the shore and jumped into the lake. It began swimming away from shore in a frantic state. Momma moose appeared along shore but did not enter the water, choosing to lumber along shore as her baby floundered further away from land. In a matter of moments, “brother” bear came onto the scene following the youngster right into the water.

To the observers, it was soon perceived the bear would out-swim the moose baby and sure enough, caught up in no time. The big “Bruno” was on the little one, grappling and pushing it under water time and time again. The ungulate toddler scrambled furiously against both the bear and perils of drowning. Meanwhile Momma could do nothing from her shoreline position and eventually meandered off into the forest, probably figuring her young’un was a lost cause. Knowing moose calves have a hard time surviving, even on land, the fisherman navigating the boat decided an attempt should be made to try and save this little guy/gal. The boat was started and headed directly for the splashing fiasco.

Miraculously, as the craft got close, this tactic diverted the bear's attention on the prey and it backed off. Apparently discouraged by the interruption, it headed back to shore, disappearing into the woods. Talk about good Samaritans! Further observation of the calf following this melee saw the frightened critter making its way back to shore. It shook itself off, amazingly none the worse for wear, seemingly uninjured. After gaining some composure, and in a bit of wonderment, it turned its head for a look at these rescuers as if to acknowledge the heroic act on its behalf.

A happy ending to this extraordinary wilderness experience occurred later as the calf gave out a few whimpering wails and Momma returned the call. Soon Momma reappeared and the family was reunited. What a sensational effort by these concerned and creative Gunflint neighbors!

A swell gathering at the Seagull Lake Community center last Sunday closed down the July 4 Holiday break. Those in attendance celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Gunflint Trail Historical Society and the fifth full year of the organization's Chik-Wauk Museum. A brief program followed the social hour and dinner with past presidents reminiscing about this splendid Gunflint Community accomplishment. See a digital of the goings-on with the Wildersmith website posting at WTIP.org.

Closing for this week, a couple reminders are extended to area residents and visitors. The July meeting of the Gunflint Trail Historical Society happens this coming Monday, the 13. The gathering will be at the Schaap Community Center (Mid-Trail) beginning at 1:30 pm.

Of additional importance, it’s “feelin’ groovy” time here at WTIP as the station is in the midst of its summer membership drive. If you’re wantin’ to feel groovy, how better to accomplish such than to get on board without delay. Continued quality programming costs big bucks, so join or renew now to help the cause. Give us a call at 387-1070 or 1-800-473-9847 or click and join at WTIP.org!

Oops it’s Canoe Race time on the Gunflint. See you there next Wednesday.

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Wildersmith on the Gunflint: July 3

The Wildersmith two are back on the Trail. After a quick run to steamy Iowa for a visit with our daughter, it’s great to be home in the “cool” north land.

The flora is oh so brilliant this time of year. Whereas the purity of crystal white in the winter goes unmatched in terms of elegance, our blooming summer has a special moment of its own.

A “technicolor” spectacular is in full array along this historic 60-mile trek through the wilderness. The rainbow of wild blooming things dazzles the visual senses. Both native and non-natives are in combination creating a “Disney”-like fantasy land.

A drive up to the black-top end at Chik-Wauk will provide a soul soothing encounter. One might even catch a glimpse of a moose or a bear, adding to the adventure.

With June having passed us by, month seven is dishing up a double whammy of lunar happenings. If it wasn’t noticed, our first day of July presented the first of two full moons during the month. Yep, it’s “blue moon” time. The second full “orb of night” will occur on the last day of our seventh yearly segment.

Our Ojibwe neighbors labeled our “big cheese” the “halfway” moon, but I don’t know to which this moniker should be applied. Meanwhile, Algonquin tribes tab the first as the “full buck” moon while the second is known as the “thunder” moon. Whatever name is applied, they will both be majestic wonders of the northern sky. A twofold celestial occurrence such as this only happens on the average every two-and-a-half years.

Speaking of other night sky wonders, the first fireflies have started flitting about this neighborhood. If this territory isn’t already a “heaven on earth,” these wonders of the beetle species make the darkness come alive as if the cosmos had settled earthward.

The Gunflint Community’s dance card is nearly full for the next two weeks. If residents and visitors can’t think of anything to do, they are not trying very hard. The first of many coming events kick off this Independence Day weekend up at the end of the Trail (Seagull Lake Community Center).

The Gunflint Trail Historical Society is celebrating its tenth anniversary of existence. At the same time, the Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center is marking its fifth full season of exhibits to the public. The gala is a catered fundraising affair on Sunday, July 5, beginning at 5:00 pm. A limited number of dinner reservations remain and a call to Chik-Wauk Museum at 388-9915 will reserve yours.

The next happening involves not only the Gunflint Trail but the “world-wide” listening audience of this extraordinary radio station. The summer membership drive commences this coming Wednesday, July 8. Both new and old listener members won’t want to miss this “Feelin’ Groovy” time to show support for this valued community resource.

Monday, July 13, will find the Gunflint Trail Historical Society holding its monthly meeting. The gathering will be at the Schaap (mid-Trail) Community Center beginning at 1:30 pm. The program will feature Memorial recognition of Trail friends and neighbors who have passed from our midst over the past year. Refreshments will again be served following the meeting.

The Gunflint Trail Canoe Races hit the Gunflint Lodge waterfront on Wednesday, July 15. This is the 39th year of the event which provides support for our Trail Volunteer Fire and EMS crews. Race activities begin at 6:00 pm with food service opening at 4:30.

The grand prize for this year's Canoe Races drawing is a super kayak from the Wenonah Canoe Company. Tickets are on sale throughout the area.

The busy Gunflint area events calendar then continues into August with two more annual happenings. The third Gunflint Woods, Winds and Strings chamber music concert takes center stage on Sunday, August 9. Once again the site will be the Schaap Community Center at 4:00 pm with a reception to follow. Ticket reservations can be made with Susan Scherer at 388-9494 or by e-mail at scher012@boreal.org beginning July 8.

A few days later, the yearly mid-Trail bash to benefit the GTVFD will take place at Schapp Community Center on Wednesday, August 12, beginning at 1:00 pm. Mark your calendars and look for more information on both events in coming Wildersmith reports.

That’s the scoop from Wildersmith on the Trail. Come on up and savor a summer trip along the historic scenic byway! Happy Birthday America!

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Photo by Steve Evans on Flickr

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: June 19

As the summer solstice checks in this weekend, more summer like conditions have taken over the Trail. We’ve had some splendid sunny days, and temps of both air and water are more suitable to the onslaught of visitors pouring into the territory. A reading of the lakeshore water at Wildersmith finds the mercury in the mid-sixties. So it won’t be long before a dip in the lake on a sticky day will feel pretty satisfying.

Several perennial wildflowers have popped open over the past few days. Most noteworthy are wild roses in many locations along back country roads. While deep in the forest, a number of digital recordings of our precious lady-slippers are being shared through cyberspace. And in areas of predominant sunshine, waves of forget-me-nots are twinkling sky-blue reflections.

On the lesser side of the blooming ledger, those colorful, but invasive, lupines are standing tall in their purple, pink and white spires. Knowing these are not the most welcome by people in the know about native flora, they are nevertheless a striking rainbow of luminance along our scenic byway. All this blooming glory is “Mother Nature” at her best!

North woods magic is seldom more delightful than twilight time on a clear sky morning. Not long ago, I was awakened early one tranquil morning and so enjoyed the privilege of observing the forest wake up. Daylight had broken, although “Sol” had not risen above the horizon,and still-hidden rays had chased the darkness. In spite of the brightening sky, lake water reflections lingered in a somber hue. The atmosphere stood dead silent. Neither leaf nor needle muttered a whisper, and ground level greenery hunkered motionless. Not a creature was stirring until the particular moment when the first beams of sun ascended the granite horizon near due east. Those piercing spears of brightness suddenly turned on the switch. A subtle, but swift burst of warmth engulfed day-break over Gunflint Lake. Almost on cue, solar energy heated the air, causing whiffs of movement. Ripples abruptly wrinkled our mirror-like liquid and on shore, foliage began to tremble. Within minutes, this day-star was fully exposed. Its radiance began to pass through a zillion minute openings in the border country canopy. As the whisper of air amplified, like twinkling lights, glitter bounced off uncountable dew-laden wilderness remnants and flashes of brilliance wiggled along the fiber network of third shift arachnids. Splashes from this great luminary grew more prominent and in their warmth, buzzing critters started swarming about. In moments, the first hummingbird darted by the window on its way to our nectar station. Soon to follow, the larger avian chimed in with their welcoming interlude and not minutes later, the first of many red rodents in our yard traversed the deck rail in search of a breakfast morsel. The day was open for business!

Speaking of buzzing critters, during our mid-day sunshine, as are others, this neighborhood is unbelievably alive with the hum of uncountable insects. They‘re feasting on either the abundant blossom nectar, or searching for some poor soul from which they might withdraw a little blood. If one is attired in proper bug protection, standing out among them catching a listen to this diverse murmur is quite the buzz (no pun intended).

In another moose sighting, a couple residing up near the end of the Trail mentioned one of those rare experiences last weekend. They came upon a Momma and her calf. This is not too unusual except that this little one was still wet behind the ears so to speak, and gawkily unstable as it tried to keep up with Mom. One would have to assume this was a newborn, not long out of the womb. What a joyous experience for not only the observers but also for the new Mother.

In closing this week, a big thumbs up to the organizers of the Boundary Waters Expo. I was there for the opening hours on Friday and have heard many complimentary comments about the entire weekend of activities.

If you didn’t get to the big “shrimp boil” put on by the Gunflint Trail Historical Society last Sunday you missed a feast of awesome proportions. Thanks to all the Gunflint Community for their help in putting on this swell gathering. I noticed several neighboring residents departing the event in a bloated state having made numerous passes along the scrumptious serving trough!

Keep on hangin’ on, and savor a Gunflint day on the Trail!

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Photo of Gunflint Loons by Bonnie Schudy

Wildersmith on the Gunflint: June 12

June is fleeting along the Trail. It’s hard to reconcile the new month is close to half gone. By next week at this time, the solstice of summer will be at hand. And although we’ll only be into the first days of “Neebing” (summer in Ojibwe), the long countdown toward shorter daylight time begins.

Early June along the Gunflint has been on the cool side so far, and no one could be pleased more than the moose and me. To make living in the forest even more calming, much needed rain has been added to the “cool” mix. The upper Trail territory received a fine Saturday night into Sunday soaker, so wildfire danger has been abated at least for the time being.

The soaking rain has made for complications in the Trail reclamation paving project. However, I’m amazed at the rapid progress made in removing the old surface. Users should be reminded this course of action takes one back in time to days when the old “Gunflint Wagon Road” was little more than a gravel path. We should all try to exercise patience during this brief inconvenience knowing the road surface will be a wonderful improvement.

And while waiting in line with traffic delays, one can reflect on what our pioneers experienced - you’re living a little bit of Gunflint history.

Marvels of the new growing season continue to unfold. Along back country roads, fiddlehead ferns are uncoiling their fronds, and the coniferous forest is lit up like the holiday season with buds exploding into candles of next generation branches. It’s said a corn field can be heard growing on a humid summer night. One can also seemingly observe, should you pause to watch, these fuzzy candelabra of red and white pines stretching ever skyward, right before your eyes.

As I key this week's area scoop, observers at Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center have been keenly focused on the loon nesting platform in the bay of the Sag Lake Corridor. I’m happy to announce the days of incubation for the two eggs are over. The chicks hatched this past Tuesday. The new parents have been diligent in their nesting responsibilities and all appears well with the new family. A photo of the mom, dad and babies can be found along with my column website at WTIP.org.

There is either a huge bear in this neighborhood or a small elephant based on a “calling card” left on the Mile O Pine recently. We all know bears “poop” in the woods, but doing such in the middle of the road seems unacceptable. But who’s going to tell ‘em?

I’ve heard a number of stories in regard to beaver activity in a few upper Gunflint locales. As we all know, engineering skills of these pesky critters is second to none. The beaver dam construction is increasing at an alarming rate on any number of creeks around these parts. This apparent overtime gnawing, and subsequent levee installations, are causing unexpected changes in wetland situations for some property owners.

A big summer weekend on the Trail commences with the first ever “Boundary Waters Expo.” The Expo will begin on Friday afternoon and go on all day Saturday and Sunday. Activities will be held at the Seagull Lake public Landing. This unique outdoor sport show of sorts will feature a line-up of exhibitors, demonstrations and outdoor living speakers. Exhibits will be under the “big top” while demonstrations and such will he held on both land and water. The event looks to be a great opportunity for wilderness living enthusiasts. For more detailed scheduling go to VisitCookCounty.com.

A second reminder is extended for the Sunday “Shrimp Boil” up at the end of the Trail. Beginning at 4:00 pm, following the close of Expo, this second annual fund-raising eat-a-thon (and bake sale) is being sponsored by the Gunflint Trail Historical Society. All are welcome. The event location is at the Seagull Lake’s Community Center. Parking is limited so car-pooling would be a good idea. Being a donor affair, a per-person donation is suggested. Proceeds will benefit the Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center. Be there or be hungry!

Keep on hangin’ on and embrace this Gunflint gift!

 

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