Listen Now
Pledge Now


 
 

County board hears more comments on Border-to-Border route

The Border-to-Border route would traverse Cook County backroads
The Border-to-Border route would traverse Cook County backroads

At the start of each county board meeting, there is a public comment period and on Tuesday, July 10 eight people spoke, all on the same topic—the proposed Border-to-Border four-wheel drive touring route.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, in conjunction with the National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council and the Minnesota 4-Wheel Drive Association, describes the Border-to-Border, or B2B, route as a backcountry adventure tour for road legal off-highway vehicles over existing gravel or paved Forest Service, DNR or county-managed roads. The route, when finalized, will be signed and mapped.

During a public meeting that drew a large crowd to the courthouse June 19, there were questions and comments both in support of, and voicing concern about the proposed route, particularly the section in Cook County. A number of the concerns expressed focused on the route’s potential impact on the local environment, including the spread of invasive species. Others, meanwhile, cited the overall culture of those who engage in motorized recreation as a reason it should not be on the Cook County branding label. 

At the county board meeting on July 10, speakers were evenly divided into pro and con camps. Four people asked the county board to tell the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources that this Border-to-Border Route is not needed in the county. Concerns were expressed about litter, noise, increased traffic and damaged watersheds.

Four others said there is no reason to stop the proposal because this is simply using the forest roads as they have always been used.

Listen: