Lake Superior Project

The Lake Superior Project / logo by Lauryl Loberg -Photo by Audun K via Flickr

LSProject: A Century of Water

Huge, endless, large—these are just a few words you might use to describe Lake Superior. At 31,700 square miles, it is the largest freshwater lake by surface area in the world.


The Lake Superior Project / logo by Lauryl Loberg

LSProject: Climate Change & The Future -Part II

There are a lot of ways climate change stands to affect Lake Superior.


The Lake Superior Project / logo by Lauryl Loberg

LSProject: Climate Change and the Future

There are a lot of ways climate change stands to affect Lake Superior.


The Lake Superior Project / logo by Lauryl Loberg

LSProject: Changing Climate, Changing Forest - Part II

There are a lot of ways climate change stands to affect Lake Superior. There's the reduction in ice cover, rising lake temperatures, the increase in storminess and declining water levels.


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LSProject: Creative Expression

Lake Superior: Fresh. Beautiful. Inspiring. The world’s largest and cleanest freshwater lake has been described in many ways.


The Lake Superior Project / logo by Lauryl Loberg

LSProject: Changing Climate, Changing Forest - Part I

There are a lot of ways climate change stands to affect Lake Superior. There's the reduction in ice cover, rising lake temperatures, the increase in storminess and declining water levels.


Graphic Lauryl Loberg / photo Travis Novitsky

LSProject: On Thin Ice

Things are heating up in the Lake Superior basin. Temps are rising, ice cover is shrinking and life is changing. There are 60 days less ice now then 100 years ago on the big lake.


Photo by Jolene4ever/Flickr (Logo by Lauryl Loberg)

LSProject: "A Huge Sink for Heat"

Things are heating up in the Lake Superior basin. Temps are rising, ice cover is shrinking and life is changing.


Image Bryan Hansel / photo Lauryl Loberg

LSProject: A Major Drop

Water levels in Lake Superior have been going down. There is less ice on the lake then there used to be and water temperatures are increasing at twice the rate of air temperatures.


The Lake Superior Project / logo by Lauryl Loberg, photo Stephan Hoglund

LSProject: The New Normal

There’s no doubt the weather in the Great Lakes Region has been off. In fact, there seems to be a new trend we can rely on, and that’s that you never really know what to expect.