North Woods Naturalist

Sunrise west harbor  from the Sunrise Series by Stephan Hoglund

Contributor(s): 
Chel Anderson
Chel Anderson is a botanist and plant ecologist. She lives in the Hovland area and keeps close tabs on daily changes happening in the great outdoors. She shares her insights with WTIP listeners every Tuesday during North Shore Morning and North Shore Digest.  Subscribe to our North Woods Naturalist podcast.

Arts, cultural and history features on WTIP are made possible in part by funding from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Check out other programs and features funded in part with support from the Heritage Fund.

 

 

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Wood frag

Time for spring singing in the marshes and blooming in the woods

This is the time of year to hear frogs in the lowlands and start to see wildflowers in the forest.

 
Marsh marigolds

Spring flowers are coming out and so are the beavers

This is the time of year we see pussy willows along the roadsides and marsh marigolds blooming in the wetlands WTIPs Jay Andersen talks with a local phenologist about early flowers, migrating bir

Ruffed grouse

Buds, birds and drumming grouse signal spring

Catkins, tiny flowers and sweet smelling Balm of Gilead are all strong signs that spring is on the way.


 
Red Squirrel

Feeder birds and chasing squirrels – spring is here

Things are changing at and under the bird feeders. Some birds are arriving, some leaving, some changing color.


Wolf at Tucker Lake. Photo by Fran Smith

Familiar clues for tree tappers and wolves begin to court

We can’t feel it, but trees give off energy that melts the snow from their bases, creating tree wells. Early spring is also time for wolf mating.


 
Aspen tress produce sunscreen

Aspen sunscreen and color changes in trees with Chel Anderson

As spring approaches we begin to notice subtle changing colors on the hillsides and along roadways. Trees and shrubs are responding to the longer days.


Grand Marais Harbor 1/02/2010

In late winter the land warms, but the big lake ices up

Why does the North Shore seem warmer this winter? Temperatures in February were some of the highest in the state. If that’s the case, why is there so much ice out on Lake Superior?