Wildersmith On The Gunflint July 22, 2009

Cloudy sky
Cloudy sky

AttachmentSize
Wildersmith_20090724.mp34.86 MB
July is fading quickly! As it slips away, a preliminary hint of fall is noted in a couple spots about the Wildersmith neighborhood. Some juvenile sugar maples have taken on a scarlet look already. This blush of color seems earlier than most years, but when one realizes that we have already lost about one-half hour’s worth of daylight in the past 30 days, guess it’s about time for this change in passing to begin.

A quick-moving thunderstorm blew through border country last week. Strong winds bashed an area at the end of the Trail, reminding folks of the might of “Mother Nature” once again. The brief turmoil downed trees and power poles, caused electrical outages and damaged a few cabins, but no injuries were reported.

The Gunflint Lake basin escaped the brunt of the gusty storm and, once more, got little to no rain. While this neighborhood remains bone dry, other spots garnered over an inch of badly needed precipitation.
At Wildersmith, I have to go back well into May to find any worthwhile accumulations. The lingering curse of the drought gods is haunting. Lake, pond and bog levels are dwindling while most creek beds reflect nothing but parched granite.
With little sunshine in the past week or so, the rainless clouds, cool temps and turbulent lake waters have kept lake temperatures in the shocking category. At last check, the mercury hovered in the low to mid-60s at our south shore dock.
The drab weather did nothing to discourage the stout-hearted upper Trail folks who put on the annual Canoe Races. The yearly happening in support of our Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire and Rescue crews was another huge success.
Canoe Races coordinators Bob Sr. and Sharon Baker, along with the able assistance of over 85 Gunflint, Seagull and Saganaga Lake volunteers, braved strong northwest winds and drizzly skies last Wednesday evening. Once again, paddlers and spectators turned out en masse for all the fun. When all was said and done, the fundraiser produced $14,000 for the GTVFD coffers. Truly a great community effort! Thanks go out to everyone that contributed prize donations and elbow grease to make the 2009 venture memorable.
We seem to be having an almost nightly reunion of foxes in the neighborhood. Barking, yipping and an occasional howl have caused us to rise right out of deep slumber at times.
The plush red one that is hanging out in my driveway culvert has a definite gourmet appetite. Leftover smoked turkey salad, herb bread and fresh strawberries have been especially to its liking in recent days; probably beats the routine rodent menu.
In addition to the paddling excitement during the canoe race evening, spectators were treated to some short-lived aerial acrobatics when an eagle soared overhead with a brave, but maybe not so bright, seagull in hot pursuit.
It seemed hard to imagine that the eagle wouldn’t just grab the annoying winged, French-fry-eating scavenger and tear it to bits. But it paid no attention, and nonchalantly soared back and forth catching the thermals, with apparently more important things on its mind.
Members and friends of the Gunflint Trail Historical Society are reminded of the monthly meeting this coming Monday, July 27, at 1:30 p.m. at the Gunflint Lodge Conference Center. Treats will be served.
Closing, I want to thank Trail residents, as well as many others from all over the county, state and country, who joined in support for our community radio station. The WTIP summer pledge drive, “Catch the Waves,” was energetic and exciting because of everyone who committed to keep this gem in our territory vibrant.
If you didn’t get to call in with a commitment of assistance, even though the official drive is completed, I’m sure a financial token of your appreciation would still be welcomed.
Keep on hangin’ on, and savor the spirit of the wild!
 
July is fading quickly! As it slips away, a preliminary hint of fall is noted in a couple spots about the Wildersmith neighborhood. Some juvenile sugar maples have taken on a scarlet look already. This blush of color seems earlier than most years, but when one realizes that we have already lost about one-half hour’s worth of daylight in the past 30 days, guess it’s about time for this change in passing to begin.
 

Delicious Bookmark this on Delicious | | Share on Twitter | Share on Facebook