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North Shore News Hour

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  • Monday 12-1pm
  • Monday 5-6pm
  • Tuesday 12-1pm
  • Tuesday 5-6pm
  • Wednesday 12-1pm
  • Wednesday 5-6pm
  • Thursday 12-1pm
  • Thursday 5-6pm
  • Friday 12-1pm
Genre: 
News

The North Shore News Hour includes up-to-the minute weather, North Shore happenings in local news, sports and entertainment, as well as a variety of features from WTIP staff and volunteers. If you miss the North Shore News Hour at noon, tune in for a replay Monday through Thursday beginning at 5:00 p.m.


What's On:
Library

Grand Marais Library hosts Jacques La Christian - 1800's Voyageur

David Popilek, a.k.a. Jacques La Christian, 1800's French Canadian Voyageur will appear at the Grand Marais Library on Friday, December 8th at 1:30pm.

CJ Heithoff talks with Jacques...

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CodeRed - High-Speed Emergency Notification System

The Cook County Sheriff’s Office is encouraging residents to sign up for CodeRED. It’s designed to be a high-speed mass notification system to help keep us safe in the event of an emergency.

CJ Heithoff talks with Valerie Marasco, director of the Office of Emergency Management & Public Information.

You can register for CodeRED at:https://www.co.cook.mn.us/under the Sheriff’s Office or Emergency Management / Public Information pages.

 

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Lake ice

North Woods Naturalist: Winter water turnover

It’s time for the winter water column turnover.  WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about this twice a year event that’s critical to the health of our lakes.
 

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Short-tailed shrew

North Woods Naturalist: Red-toothed shrews

The Incredible Shrinking Shrew. No, it’s not the title of a Sci-Fi movie. WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about a winter survival tactic of red-toothed shrews.
 

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Superior National Forest Update November 10, 2017

Hi.  I’m Renee Frahm, Visitor Information Assistant, with this week’s National Forest Update - information on conditions affecting travel and recreation on the east end of the Superior.  With the change of season, we’re changing this program to air only every other week until spring.  Here’s what’s happening these next two weeks.

Winter is definitely here, especially inland, up over the hill.  Snow may have melted along the shore, but you don’t have to get too far from Lake Superior until you hit the white stuff.  While the trails aren’t groomed, people have already been skiing at Pincushion.  This is the time of year though that snowmobiles can really do some damage to that base layer of snow which gives us good trails all winter.  On trails, take it easy so you don’t dig through the snow to the ground, or wait until trails are packed by a groomer.  Cross country snowmobile travel isn’t allowed until there is four inches or more of snow on the ground, and snowmobiles are never allowed on plowed roads. 

Lakes are beginning to ice in, but none of them are really safe to be on yet.  Most large lakes are still open, but at least Sawbill is iced over.  Some roads are iced over too - it’s time to remember all you forgot about winter driving over the past several months.  Slow down, be cautious, and give yourself time to relearn how your vehicle handles and brakes on snow and ice.  There are fewer people out on the roads in the winter, so leave an itinerary of where you are going with someone.  That way, if you do run off the road, someone will eventually come looking for you.
 
Truck traffic is using the same roadways as last week.  Hauling on Gunflint is taking place on the following roads: Firebox, Blueberry, Greenwood, Shoe Lake, South Brule, Lima Grade, Ball Club, Devil Track, Forest Road 1385 and the Gunflint Trail.  Tofte logging traffic will be on the Pancore, Sawbill Trail, Dumbbell River Road, Wanless Road, Lake County 7 and 705, the 4 Mile Grade, The Grade, Perent Lake Road, Trappers Lake Road, Temperance River Road, and the Six Hundred Road. 

There are plenty of hunters out in the woods during deer season.  Whether or not you are hunting, stay safe and wear orange when you are in the woods.  You and your pet!  Respect no trespassing signs on private land, and remember that some private roads may be closed to motor use, even if they cross public land.  Use your Motor Vehicle Use Map to find out what roads are open to what use in the winter.  If you don’t like paper, but love technology, you can download these maps and use an app that shows your exact location on the map.  Remember, take those deer stands down after season, and no permanent stands are to be left on National Forest lands.

Along with our activities, our birds are shifting to winter.  Flocks of snow buntings along the roadsides create beautiful displays of black and white wings when they take off, but are unfortunately easy to hit with vehicles.  There are still lots of migrating hawks, particularly rough legged hawks, which can be seen perched by the side of Highway 61.  Redpolls and pine grosbeaks are back for winter at feeders, but since there are still a few bears up and about, you should still be taking in those feeders at night.

We are looking for some citizen science input on lynx.  Winter snow makes these secretive cats easier to find because of their tracks.  If you find lynx tracks, take a picture with your phone.  Put a glove or coin or something else near the track in the photo to show how large it is.  If your phone notes the GPS coordinates with the photo, that’s great, otherwise note the area you where you found tracks, and let us know. 

It is time to quit complaining about the end of fall and start enjoying our Minnesota winter.   Those last minute fall chores that never happened because of the snowfall, well, you’ll just have to figure them out next spring. Until next time, this has been Renee Frahm with the National Forest update.
 

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Bird Migration

North Woods Naturalist: High flying birds

On an average day birds fly around 500 or so feet high. During migration they climb a lot higher…a lot higher than we mammals could ever hope to survive.

WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about high flying birds.
 

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Leaves on the Ground

North Woods Naturalist: Autumn winding down

There are a number of indications that autumn is in full swing, maybe even turning the corner.

WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about autumn winding down.

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Autumn is in the air

North Woods Naturalist: Heading into fall

September is gone and we’re moving into October, and soon we’ll be experiencing all the signs of winter. WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about heading into fall.

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(Barbara Monroe/Flickr)

North Woods Naturalist: Yellowjackets

Throughout the northern part of the state, and here in Cook County, we’re receiving numerous accounts of aggressive yellowjackets. WTIP’s Jay Andersen talks with North Woods Naturalist Chel Anderson about what’s up with the wasps.

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Northern Sky: September 16 - 29

Deane Morrison is a science writer at the University of Minnesota. She authors the Minnesota Starwatch column, and contributes to WTIP bi-weekly with "Northern Sky," where she shares what's happening with stars, planets and more.

Photo courtesy of NASA

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