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Wildersmith on the Gunflint November 23,2017

WTIP News     November 24, 2017     Wildersmith on the Gunflint    by  Fred Smith

‘Tis the season, let the holiday madness begin, while we “Gunflinters” watch the chaos from afar. Blessed is our border country peace and quiet with the bounty of “Amazon” and UPS just a click away. No crowds, no fuss, what a deal!                                                                                                          

Speaking of good tidings for the coming season, the Smith’s will be looking forward to those good folks over on Birch Lake lighting up their annual holiday sentinel in the coming days. With exception of some decorative lighting in the mid-Trail business area, this sparkling testament to the holidays, adds a glitter of excitement to the otherwise absolute dark of night, along the byway.                                                                                                                                                                         

Another seasonal happening is the Borealis Chorale held in early December at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in the village. Several of our Gunflint Trail neighbors are members of this amazingly talented choir and orchestra. I’m told practices have been long underway.                                                                                               

We at Wildersmith hope your stuffing day was a pleasant gathering of family and friends.  The Smith’s had the pleasure of working/serving at the forty-fourth UCC Community dinner. Locally, this long running Thanksgiving celebration is such a joy for both the preparing volunteers and those who come to partake in the bounty.                                                                                                                                                        

Nationwide, and even on the local scene, there is however some measure of sadness. If we, in this self-proclaimed greatest country of the world, really pay attention, over forty millions of our fellow citizens struggle with hunger while living in poverty, including thirteen  millions of children who go to bed hungry each night.                                                                                                                                                  

How can we ever be so self-satisfied in times of this on-going need, while over indulging? This is a “great American tragedy” and should be real food for thought as we begin to “just go nuts at Christmas.”  Instead of putting Thanksgiving in the rear view mirror, every one of means should be looking at themselves in this mirror asking, “what can I do”!  Solving this domestic hunger problem alone will better define the US of A as “truly” great!                                                                                                                               

Reflecting on our wild country weather, it’s been pretty seasonal for the second straight week. A couple mini snow, sleet and freezing drizzle episodes have been the only moisture happenings in the upper Trail region. Meanwhile the mercury spiked up for a drippy day or two and then scurried back down to make more crust on the miniscule fallen white.                                                                                             

With coldness in mind, the big lakes up this way remain rolling with even the slightest whimper of wind, while ice making continues on lakes south of the Laurentian Divide. I’ve observed Poplar Lake, the largest down that direction, has put its’ on winter coat, so those up toward Trails end, can’t be too far behind. A couple nights of calm air should do the trick.                                                                                      
 
By the way the average “ice on” for the Gunflint is in the second week of December. I’m guessing the yearly “ice on” contest pool for those living around Gunflint Lake is taking dates right now!                                                                                                                                                                                         
A fresh skiff of snow last Saturday night covered the crusty blanket in the yard around Wildersmith. Not to beat a deceased horse about my observance of tracks in the snow, foot prints in the fluff were so many one would think a herd went through. Fox and pine martens, to mouse tunnels and other neighborhood beings in between, left their imprints. All of which were headed in a hundred different directions.                                                                                                                           

Cross country skiing is on the minds of many, and trail preparations are well under way. However, the grooming process is only in the packing stage. According to Dan Baumann at Golden Eagle, the snow base is adequate, but tracks have not been laid as this weeks’ report airs. I’m sure other sections of the mid to upper Trail system are at similar stages of getting ready. A check of lodge websites will surely advise when final touches have been applied. In the meantime, skiers are welcome to come out and get on the packed lowland stretches.                                                                                                                    

Recently, during a break from saw dust making, a frenzy of blue jays caught my attention. At our deck side eatery, two of the provision stations feature ear corn on a spike. I watched as half dozen jaybirds took turns badgering each other for position in order to chow down on the golden grains.                                                                                                                                                                                  

Now some of you listener/readers might be wondering if this guy doesn’t have enough to do, other than watching a flock of birds making pigs of them self. Guess I don’t, but I did find interesting, there was one, a bully amongst the bullies; two, there may be some apparent pecking order; and three, the number of maize seeds gorged into their gullets ranged from six to twelve per stop.                                                                                                                                                        

The gluttonous interlude found the two cobs devoured of their golden elements in fifteen minutes. While it would seem they might choke, none did during this chapter of my “wild neighborhood” story.                                                                                                                                                              

For WTIP, this is Wildersmith, on the Gunflint Trail, where every day is great, as each one offers something new, to see and learn! 
 

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